• Denomination

  • Style

  • Clear all search and filter

St Nicholas

Fyfield

St Nicholas Ancient

Heythrop

St Nicholas the Wonderworker

Oxford
Consecrated in 2010 the church occupies the site of an earlier mission chapel of ease (c.1913) associated with the church of St Nicholas in Old Marston. Significant alterations to the building have been undertaken since its purchase in 2008. It contains a narthex separated from the body of the church and a gallery designated as the choir loft. The interior is richly decorated and furnished.

St Nicolas

Abingdon

St Olave

Fritwell
A Norman church much altered by G E Street in 1865

St Oswald

Widford
A tiny church in the Windrush Valley, built on the site of an earlier Roman villa or temple. The building is mainly 13th Century with remnants of an 11th Century Saxon or Norman building. It has box pews.

St Patrick

Shrivenham
From 1940 the building was dedicated to Roman Catholic worship. It is now a place for multi-faith worship

St Patrick

Watchfield

St Paul

Banbury

St Paul

Culham
St Paul’s Church is situated at the end of the village green, opposite the Manor House and gardens. It has a long history and was closely linked in medieval times to Abingdon Abbey. The oldest part of the present church is the tower, built in 1710. Substantial rebuilding of the nave and chancel took place in the 19th century.

St Paul

Highmoor
This church is now closed for worship and is in the course of being sold on the open market. The parish has been combined with Nettlebed.

(For information: The church was built in 1859 and is constructed in knapped flint with ashlar detailing on a red and grey brick wall plate.)

St Paul's Church Centre

Banbury

St Peter

Alvescot
A grade II* Early English church with 13th Century north transept and Perpendicular 15th Century tower. The chancels was rebuilt in 1872 and there is a Burne Jones window in the south transept. The Gothic bell tower has a ring of six bells, cast in 1727, 1796, 1859 and 1985.

St Peter

Wolvercote

St Peter

Wallingford
The original parish church of St. Peter was destroyed during the Civil War (1646). A new church was built between 1763 and 1769, which remained in use for two hundred years, closing 29th. June, 1969. Nowadays it is used for worship only once a year, to celebrate the feast of St. Peter. It is looked after by the Churches Conservation Trust.

St Peter

Wootton

St Peter

Wilcote
NORTH LEIGH WILCOTE SP31NE 5/188 Church of St. Peter 12/09/55 GV II* Church. Late C12 with mid C13 and early C14 alterations; restored 1858 by H. Woodyer and 1868 by A.W. Blomfield. Coursed limestone rubble; gabled stone slate roof. Nave and chancel.

St Peter

Broughton Poggs
A church of considerable antiquity. A pretty 18th Century memorial.

St Peter

Cassington
Built in 1123 by the treasurer to Henry I, Geoffrey de Clinton this church was altered and added to in the fourteenth century. The most obvious Norman features include the round headed windows and doorways and the corbel table which runs along both sides of the chancel and nave and form a chunkily carved gallery of heads both human and animal. The church contains precious early woodwork and painted glass

St Peter

Charney Bassett
Some time in the first part of the 12th century that earlier church was replaced by a Norman building of stone, probably on the same site. That first Norman church was much smaller than the current building, and only parts of it survive in the south wall of the nave.

St Peter

Cornwell

St Peter

Little Wittenham
Grade II* listed.

The tower is C14, with the remainder of the church being re-built in C19. Building materials consist of uncoursed squared limestone rubble with stone dressings. The roof is of old plain tile.

Central features include a three-bay nave, chancel, vestry and west tower. There is also a gabled stone porch to the centre of the nave with a two centred arch way. There is a battlemented parapet.

There are plate tracery windows to the nave, and cusped plate tracery windows to the chancel. The tower features a two light window with reticulated tracery.

The church has a striking West tower (Decorated and Perpendicular) with a stair turret. This tops an Early English rebuilt nave and chancel of 1868 by Buckeriedge. Tomb chests and brasses remain in situ.

Interior:

C19 fixtures and fittings.

St Peter

Didcot
A rapid expansion of Didcot began in the mid-1840s following the arrival of the railway. The new settlement of New Town began in the mid-1860s, later becoming North Hagbourne and eventually Northbourne. Building of a new church began in 1889, funded by GWR shareholders, and it was dedicated for worship in 1890 and given the name of St Peter’s.

St Peter

Marsh Baldon
Grade II* listed.

C14/C15 origins.

Building materials consist of rendered limestone rubble and limestone ashlar, with a plain-tile roof.

Central features include a nave, chancel, north aisle, vestry, west tower and south porch.

Windows date from C14 and contain examples of three and four light designs in Decorated style, with ogee tracery.

The south porch is timber framed and probably C14, but was repaired during C16. It shelters a doorway with a Romanesque dial set in the tympanum.

The C14 tower has a two light window with reticulated tracery.

Interior:

C15 piscina in the north aisle, with a four bay C19 arcade in the nave. Roofing is C19.

St Peter

Easington

St Peter

Eynsham

St Peter

Filkins
The church was built to the designs of George Edmund Street in 1855-7. St Peters consists of a nave with west bellcote, small south porch, north aisle and an apsidal chancel with north vestry.

St Peter

Great Haseley
The Church of England parish church of Saint Peter dates from about 1200. The three-bay arcades linking the nave with the north and south aisles are in a Transitional style from Norman to Early English Gothic, as is an external doorway that has been re-set on the west side of the bell-tower. The chancel and its arch were built late in the 13th century, and it retains all of its Decorated Gothic windows from that time. In the 14th century each aisle was extended eastwards with a fourth bay, and at the end of each aisle is a chapel with a squint into the chancel. The northeast chapel is Perpendicular Gothic, as are the bell-tower and the clerestory that was added to the nave. The Gothic Revival architect Thomas Garner restored the chancel in 1897. St Peter’s is a Grade I listed building.

The tower has a ring of six bells. Four of them — the present third, fourth, fifth and tenor bells — existed by 1552. In 1641 Ellis I Knight of Reading recast what are now the fourth and fifth bells and cast a new bell (now the second bell), increasing the ring to five. Late in the 1690s William and Robert Cor of Aldbourne, Wiltshire recast what is now the third bell. Thomas Rudhall of Gloucester recast the tenor bell in 1774 and cast a new treble bell in 1775, increasing the ring to six.In 1925 Gillett & Johnston of Croydon re-cast the treble and the third bells, an event watched by King George V and Queen Mary. Also in 1925 all six were re-hung in a new iron frame, which has capacity for the ring to be increased to eight.

St Peter

Hanwell
Largely 14th century, this church is particularly noted for the vigorous stone carving both inside and out. Decorated and Perpendicular window tracery is enhanced by the plain glass in all the windows.

St Peter

Hook Norton
St. Peter’s church was first registered in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle of 922 AD. The present building is of Norman origin but also has Early English, Decorated Gothic and Perpendicular Gothic features.

St Peter

Bucknell

St Peter

Drayton
The church has existed in Drayton for many centuries. It was a chapel subordinate to the mother church of St Helen’s, Abingdon from 1284, and formal separation occurred in 1868.

St Peter

Stoke Lyne
Grade II* listed.
Building materials consist of squared coursed limestone and coursed limestone rubble. Roofs are steeply pitched and of stone slate with stone slate gables.
Features include a C12 chancel and nave, C13 north aisle, C14 south tower with a C19 south porch. There is also a north vestry.
Windows date from C12 and include a triplet of lancets located in the chancel. There is a Geometrical window directly above. There are further lancets on the south side of the chancel. Other windows include a four light window on the west side with plate tracery. The tower also features a three light reticulated window.
There is a crenelated parapet.
Interestingly, the south doorway features an arch decorated with zig-zags. Above it is a C12 carved figure of St. Peter.

Interior:
C19 chancel archs with C19 roofs. Most of the fixtures and fittings are C19 with the exception of the stone font which is C12.

St Peter

Drayton

St Peter ad Vincula

South Newington
Village church with exceptional wall paintings, which include paintings done around 1300 to the North Aisle Courtly Style, oil on plaster of St Margaret and the Dragon, St James, the Martyrdom of St Thomas-a -Becket, and the murder of Thomas of Lancaster, (the King’s favourite). Also, in the Nave, late fifteenth century paintings of the Passion Series in primitive arcaic style

St Peter and St Paul

Checkendon
A small Norman flint and stone church in a pretty Chiltern village. The semi-circular apse has early 13th-century wall-paintings and the monuments include a modern window engraved by Laurence Whistler.

St Peter and St Paul

Deddington
This church has a handsome tower, and is situated right in the heart of the village among the shops, pubs and near the hotel. The Patronal statues on the tower date from 1684. The nave and chancel are 13th century.

St Peter and St Paul

Swalcliffe
An interesting church built of Hornton Limestone in the ironstone country near Banbury.Parts date back to Saxon times (eg 2 small windows and the nave). The church was added to by the Normans, and in the 14th Century it was endowed by William Wykeham, Bishop of Winchester. The Tower dates from late 13th Century.

St Philip

Little Rollright
Church. Chancel probably early C13, altered C15; nave C16; tower built (or rebuilt) 1617 for William Blower. Limestone ashlar, coursed squared marlstone with limestone-ashiar dressings, and some render; concrete plain-tile roofs. Chancel, nave, west tower and south porch. Rendered chancel retains shallow C13 buttresses but has fine 3-light C15 windows to south, with 4-centre-arched heads, Perpendicular drop tracery and scrolled hood stops; a further 3-light window to east has lozenge stops and is set within a casement moulding. Ashlar south wall of nave has a wide square-headed 5-light window with arched lights, hollow-chamfered mullions and recessed spandrels; the label mould has lozenge stops. The south doorway and the entrance to the small porch have shallow chamfered Tudor arches. Marlstone tower, with stepped diagonal buttresses and a crenellated parapet with small corner pinnacles, has a west window of 2 arched hollow-chamfered lights below a label and has similar bell-chamber openings; a wall tablet, framed by Ionic columns, has a shield of arms, the date 1617 and the inscription “WILLIAM BLO(?)/ESQVIER LORD OF/THIS MANOR BV/(?) THIS TOWER”.

Interior: both splays of the east window have moulded image brackets on tall pedestals and elaborate crocketed canopies. Early-C13 chancel arch of 2 chamfered orders has impost-capitals returning as strings. Wide chamfered tower arch may be earlier than 1617. Simple roofs are C18/early C19. Above the tower arch are traces of wall paintings. Fittings include late-C17 barleytwist communion rails, a small font on a tall panelled stem (probably C17) and a C19 stone pulpit. 2 large canopied monuments in the chancel commemorate members of the Dixon family. The earlier (probably early C17) is in painted stone with Ionic columns, obelisks, an achievement of arms and strapwork enclosing a vase of flowers and an hour glass on a skull; the full-length recumbent effigy is in armour. The monument to Edward Dixon and his 2 wives (c.1650) is in alabaster and black marble, and has the 3 figures kneeling around a prayer desk in a recess flanked by black Corinthian columns; the front panel is incised with the kneeling figures of 10 children. (Buildings of England: Oxfordshire: p690)

St Simon and St Jude

Milton-u-Wychwood
Church of SS Simon and 5.2.76 Jude GV II Church of England church. 1853-4. Architect G E Street, Coursed rubble with ashlar dressings, concrete tile roofs. Late C13 style; 5-bay aisled nave with south porch, 2-bay chancel with south chapel. Large west buttress to central octagonal belfrey capped by spirelet and having mini- mum lucarnes and gables. Plate tracery side windows, foiled spherical triangles to clerestory, geometrical tracery to lancets flanking west buttress and large 5-light east window. South porch has 1300-style mouldings and pointed entrance on heavy responds, vaulted porch with domical vault on ribs, treble chamfer to south door and pyramidal stops; south aisle has cusped head archway from porch; west window of porch is stunted and has oval tracery.

St Stephen

Clanfield

St Swithun

Compton Beauchamp
The Church of England parish church of Saint Swithun is 13th century and is built of chalk. This ancient church is unusual in that most of the furnishings date from the 20th century. These were commissioned by Samuel Gurney, an Anglo Catholic who lived in Compton Beauchamp from 1924 until his death in 1968. He commissioned the artist Martin Travers to redesign the interior, which was completely reordered between 1925 and 1950.

St Swithun

Merton
The Church of England parish church of Saint Swithun is Decorated Gothic, built early in the 14th century. It has a south aisle, linked with the nave by an arcade of four bays. Late in the 15th century the Perpendicular Gothic clerestory was added to the nave. The chancel windows and one window in the south aisle are also Perpendicular Gothic. The font is much older than the church, dating from late in the 12th century.

St. Swithun’s had a north aisle but it was demolished in the 15th or 16th century. Its arcade of three bays was blocked up and remains in the north wall of the nave.[3] The tower had a spire but it became unsafe and in 1796 it was removed.

St. Swithun’s most notable monuments are wall-mounted ones in the chancel commemorating John Doyley (died 1593) and his wife, Elizabeth Poole (died 1621) and Richard Harrington (died 1712). The Poole monument has strapwork and Tuscan columns but is significantly mutilated and in want of restoration.

A turret clock for St. Swithun’s was made late in the 17th century. Its original dial had only an hour hand. In 1867 this was replaced with a new dial that has both hour and minute hands. Some time after 1989 a new turret clock was installed; the 17th century original is now displayed in the nave.

The Gothic Revival architect Charles Buckeridge restored St. Swithun’s from 1865[5] until 1872. St. Swithun’s had been decorated with mediaeval wall paintings, once brightly coloured but by 1823 described as “dim with age”. During the restoration work it was found impossible to remove the layers of whitewash covering them.

St Swithun

Kennington
The building stood on the site of the present church hall and the diarist, Thomas Hearne, described it in 1724 as a ‘very small, mean building’ which ‘cannot, by the make of the building, be very ancient’. Whatever its age its condition must, by then, have been deteriorating, through lack of maintenance. By the middle of the 18th century it was probably nearing its end and in 1783 the Rector of Sunningwell reported to the Bishop that no trace of it remained. In 1828 a new church was built on the old site by Henry Bowyer, rector of Sunningwell and brother of the Lord of the Manor, Sir George Bowyer. The curate of Sunningwell was placed in charge and its arrangement remained in being until 1866 when Kennington became an ecclesiastical parish in its own right.

The 1828 building with seats for 80 people was large enough to cater for a purely farming community but as Kennington began to grow in size after the first war, the need for a larger church became obvious, but it was not until after the second world war that it became possible to start building it. Land next to the existing church had been donated for the purpose in 1936 and 20 years later the foundation stone of the present church was laid

The official opening and blessing of the church took place on June 17, 1934. The building was designed by Harrison and Company (Birmingham) and Grove Brothers of MiIton-under-Wychwood constructed the design using stone from Chadlington near Woodstock.

St Teresa

Charlbury

St Thomas Chapel

Watchfield
Built during 1857-58 by G.E.Street in gothic style. Building material consists of rubble stone with dressed stone buttresses.
Architectural features include a three-bay nave, one-bay chancel, a north aisle and a west facing bellcote.
Windows are also gothic in style, with lots of examples of cusped ‘y’ tracery.
There is a West porch with a chamfered arch.

Interior:
Rather plain, featuring perpendicular style capitals across the north aisle. The roof is an open rafter roof.
Transitional style font.

St Thomas More

Boars Hill

St Thomas More

Kidlington
The church with a characteristic copper spire was built in the late sixties in brick with shallow nave and larger sanctuary.

St Thomas of Canterbury

Elsfield

St Thomas of Canterbury

Goring
Located in the Goring Cap, between the Berkshire Downs and Chiltern Hills, the early C12 church is little altered and excavations have uncovered the remains of an Augustine priory built in the late C12.

New and improved Roof Alarm Grants

You can now apply for a grant of up to 80% of the cost of an alarm plus the first year’s maintenance

You can now apply for a grant of up to 80% of the cost of an alarm plus the first year’s maintenance