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St Mary Virgin

Thame
St Mary’s Church was begun in the 13th century at the instigation of the Bishop of Lincoln, Robert Grossteste. Vestiges of the original building can still be seen, such as the pillars and arches in the nave and the aisle windows which date from the early 14th century. The building was substantially restored in the years between 1889 and 1897 by the architect J.O. Scott.

According to the churchwarden’s accounts, the north transept was built in 1442 and since the windows in the south transept are of similar style, it was probably built at the same time. The south transept was known as St Christopher’s Chapel and houses two table tombs belonging to the Quartermain family. One of these, the tomb of Richard Quartermain, his wife Sybil and their godson Richard Fowler, dates from 1477 and is notable for the armour depicted on its brasses.

The stalls with linenfold panelling in the chancel were bought from Thame Abbey in 1540. There are several interesting tombs within the chancel.

The most prominent tomb is that of Lord Williams and his wife Elizabeth (see photo below, and his Wikipedia entry) Lord Williams served under both Queen Mary and Queen Elizabeth 1, becoming a man of great influence and wealth. He founded the grammar school [now a comprehensive school], which still bears his name.

St Mary Virgin

Weston-on-The-Green
Grade II* listed.
Origins in early C13. Building material consists of limestone rubble with ashlar dressings. Architectural features include a four-bay nave, south porch and west tower. The east wall of the nave is blank but contains traces of the former chancel, which was demolished in C19. Interestingly, a lot of the stone work of the nave appears to have been re-used.
The windows range from C13 to C19. There is also a blocked doorway on the south wall and a similar doorway to the west.
The church also features a C15 parapet with angel gargoyles.

Interior:
Transitional tower arch with C19 hood mould.
The font is tub shaped and dates from C12.

St Mary Virgin

Charlbury

St Mary Virgin

Cropredy
Cropredy’s great treasure is the very rare pre-Reformation Brass Lectern in the form of an eagle. St Mary’s was largely rebuilt in the first half of the 14th century in typical Decorated style with tall and elegant arcades in both aisles.

St Mary Virgin

Longcot
The Church of England parish church of Saint Mary the Virgin has a 13th-century Norman nave and chancel. One lancet window on the north side of the chancel is original but all other the current windows were inserted later. On the north side of the church they include one two-light Decorated Gothic and one four-light Perpendicular Gothic window. The pulpit is Jacobean.

St. Mary’s original west tower collapsed while the bells were being rung. The tower was rebuilt in 1721 or 1722. Abraham Rudhall of Gloucester cast five new bells in 1722, followed by the treble bell in 1729 to complete a ring of six. Four stone urns, mounted on iron spikes at each corner of the tower, were removed in the late 1970s for safety.[citation needed]

St Mary Virgin

Iffley
One of the finest Norman churches in the country, St Mary’s was built about 1170 and has undergone few alterations. The simple plan consists of nave, tower and chancel. There is much fine beak-head and zigzag carving, both within and without. Note particularly the decoration on the west and south doorways.

St Mary Virgin

Ipsden
An interesting small C12 church close to the Chiltern hills, formerly a chapel of North Stoke, and under the patronage of the Abbey of Bec in Normandy, which may account for the elaborate details in the chancel.

St Mary-le-More

Wallingford
St. Mary-le-More occupies a central position in Wallingford. It is believed that there has been a Christian building on the site since at least Norman times. That first Christian building was rebuilt at the end of the 13th Century. The building has undergone at least two major changes since then and is now used for many community activities as well as for regular worship.

St Mary’s Church, Lower Heyford and Caulcott

Lower Heyford
Consecrated in 1065 by the Saxon Bishop Wulfin of Dorchester, the current building dates from its rebuilding around 1350, with substantial 14th and 15th century and 19th century alterations, the latter undertaken by H J Underwood and C Buckeridge (1848 and 1867 respectively).

St Mary’s Convent

Wantage
The Community of St Mary the Virgin (CSMV) was founded in 1848 by William John Butler, the then 29 year old Vicar of Wantage, following the spiritual revival in the Church of England known as the Oxford Movement. CSMV was one of the first Anglican Religious Communities to be founded in England since the Dissolution of the Monasteries by Henry VIII.

St Mary's Convent

Wantage

St Matthew

Harwell
St Matthew’s Harwell exemplifies the architecture from Traditional Norman, through early English, to decorated. It appears to have been constructed as follows: 1190-1200 North and South Transepts, 1200-1220 Tower and Nave Arcades, 1270-1310 Chancel, 1275-1325 South and North Aisle Walls and reconstructed Porch, 1975 Ground Floor and Upper Room extension to North Wall.

St Matthew

Oxford
Canon Alfred William Millard Christopher (1820 – 1913), who had been Rector of St Aldate’s Church since 1859, raised funds for the building of a large church on Marlborough Road, one of the principal roads in Grandpont which followed the line of a former spur track from the nearby Great Western Railway. A fine church dedicated to St Matthew was built and consecrated by Bishop William Stubbs on 21st June l890.

Canon Christopher was criticized for spending too much money on the church when a simpler structure might have sufficed. The stonework and roof structure have much to be admired. The violet and pink glass used in the windows on all but the north side gives a pleasant dappled light in sunshine. The pews were, however, stained dark brown but have now been sanded back to their lovely natural colour.

St Matthew

Langford
An impressive church in a remote village, with a central Saxon tower of about 1040 supported by massive piers, a Norman nave and a 13th century chancel. Two notable limestone sculptures, one of Christ with arms outstretched and one of the Crucifixion, are either late Saxon or early Norman.

St Michael

Aston Tirrold
A medium sized Mediaeval parish church.

St Michael

Cumnor

St Michael

Barford St Michael
Simple country church, almost all Norman, except for south aisle added in 13th century. Across the little river Swere is Barford St John, a small medieval church with a strange tower and porch by G E Street.

St Michael

Sonning Common
Situated near the village centre, in an area surrounded by mainly beech woodland and countryside, this is a modern brick built church.

St Michael

Begbroke

St Michael

Stanton Harcourt
12th Century Norman origins, with 13th phase of building when Chancel replaced, transepts added and the crossing arches rebuilt in Early English gothic. Major 15th Century alterations to Church including final stage of the tower in Perpendicular style. Fine tomb chest and statues of members of the Harcourt family. The chancel built in the mid 13th is striking both for its size in relation to the nave and the amount of light admitted through the Early English lancet windows. The remains of the medieval shrine of St Edburg is situated in the Chancel.

St Michael & All Angels

Blewbury
A substantial Mediaeval parish church. A spacious church with a late Norman vaulted chancel and tower crossing, with south and north aisles and west tower added in the 13th to 15th centuries. It is set in a pretty village at the foot of the Berkshire Downs.

St Michael & All Angels

Clifton Hampden

St Michael & All Angels

Newton Purcell
Grade II listed.

C12 origins with C19 restoration.

Building materials consist of stucco with limestone quoins. The roof is C20 tile.

Features include a C12 doorway moved from the north to the south entrance and a combined nave and chancel.
The south doorway also includes C12 zig-zag decoration and a tympanum.

Windows are C19 in lancet style.

Interior:

C13 piscina with C19 fixtures and fittings.

St Michael and A.Angels

Summertown

St Michael and All Angels

Alkerton
Much of the church is Norman,with massive arches supporting the tower. The clerestory dates from the 14th century and includes a splendidly carved corbel table.

St Michael and All Angels

Eaton Hastings

St Michael and All Angels

New Marston

St Michael and All Angels

Finmere

St Michael and All Angels

Great Tew
The church was originally Norman but was rebuilt in the 13th and 14th centuries. It lies on the edge of a picturesque village of thatched cottages and is approached by a tree-lined path. The monuments include an elegant stone sculpture of Mary Anne Boulton by Sir Francis Chantrey, dated 1834.

St Michael and All Angels

Leafield
A beautiful Victorian church by George Gilbert Scott.

St Michael and All Angels

Letcombe Bassett
Grade II* listed.

C12 origins although re-modelled in C19. Building materials consist of chalk and sarsen coursed rubble, which is rendered, with limestone quoins and dressings. The roof is of tile.

Central features include a C12 chancel, remodelled nave, south aisle and C19 vestry. There is a late C13 west tower. The north wall of the chancel contains a C12 round headed lancet and a C12 doorway. The south wall also contains a C12 lancet window. The gabled porch is C19 and the west tower features late C17/early C18 English bond walling.

Interior:

Chancel walls, piscina, altar rail and floor tiles are all C19. The chancel arch is C12 and the limestone font is C19.

St Michael and All Angels

Steventon
A charming parish church, the earliest part of which is a column dating from 13th Century. The Decorated style of the window suggests it was substantially rebuilt in the 14th Century, probably when Steventon Priory, which was in effect a business venture supporting the Abbey of Bec in Normandy, had control of the church, the Prior being both Lord of the Manor and Rector of Steventon.

St Michael and All Angels

Fringford

St Michael and All Angels

Abingdon

St Michael at the North Gate

Oxford
Originally built around 1000–1050, with the tower of 1040 still in existence, the church is Oxford’s oldest building. The church tower is Saxon. The architect John Plowman rebuilt the north aisle and transept in 1833.

The Oxford Martyrs were imprisoned in the Bocardo Prison by the church before they were burnt at the stake in what is now Broad Street nearby, then immediately outside the city walls, in 1555 and 1556. Their cell door can be seen on display in the church’s tower.

St Michael at the North Gate is the current City Church of Oxford. That title was originally held by St Martin’s Church at Carfax, and then by All Saints Church in the High Street when St Martin’s Church was demolished in 1896. City Church status passed to St Michael’s when All Saints Church was declared redundant in 1971 (it was subsequently converted into the library of Lincoln College, Oxford). The City Church is where the Mayor and Corporation of Oxford are expected to worship. The parishes of St Martin’s and All Saints are now amalgamated with St Michael’s.

St Nicholas

Tackley
Grade II* listed.
C11 origins. Building materials consist of limestone rubble, coursed rubble and coursed stone.
Features include a C13 tower, north transept, porch, two-bay chancel and three-bay nave with south aisle. Roofs are shallow pitched and of lead with ashlar and gabled parapets. The church is in a cruciform plan.
Windows date from C13 to C15 and feature three original lancets with stone mouldings. The remainder feature a variety of ‘y’ tracery and panel tracery. There is a C15 three-light Perpendicular window in the north wall and a four-light Perpendicular window in the south wall.
The porch is of interest and features an Early English style doorway with various stone mouldings.

Interior:
Plastered walls with a C15 piscina on an octagonal shaft at the south-east window. The north wall includes three Tudor arches that vary in width.
Most of the interior roofing is C19 with chamfered tie beams and braces.
The font is C13

St Nicholas

Asthall

St Nicholas

Tadmarton

St Nicholas

Baulking

St Nicholas

Britwell Salome

St Nicholas

Chadlington
Chadlington lies in rolling countryside in North West Oxfordshire on the edge of the Cotswolds. St. Nicholas is mainly 13th-century, with a 14th-century tower and Victorian chancel.

St Nicholas

East Challow
The Nave and Chancel originate from the 13th century although reconstructed a number of times, most recently in 1858. Highlights are a partially restored 13th century window on the north side of the Sanctuary.

St Nicholas

Forest Hill

St Nicholas

Old Marston
Grade I listed.
C13 origins.
Building materials consist of limestone rubble and ashlar with stone-slate roofs.
Features include an aisled nave, C15 chancel, west tower and south porch.
Windows date from C15 and include a variety of two and three light designs, with tracery in Perpendicular style.
There is a re-set Decorated doorway in the south porch and a clerestory with two light windows.

Interior:
C13 chancel arch with four and three bay nave arcades. The chancel floor features Medieval encaustic tiles.
Fixtures and fittings range from C15 to C16. There are also traces of Medieval wall paintings over the chancel arch.

St Nicholas

Piddington
Grade II* listed.

Late C13 origins with later modifications and alterations.

Buildings consist of random and coursed limestone rubble with ashlar dressings. The roofs are of old plain-tile and Welsh slate.

Features include a C13 chancel, nave, south aisle, south porch and west tower.

Windows date from C14 and C15, and include various examples of two/three light designs with Perpendicular tracery. There are also two plain lancet windows in the south aisle.
The west tower is C16 and two storeys high. It has a crenellated parapet, a two light west window and an arched west doorway.

Interior: C14 two-seat sedilia with elaborate carvings and foliage. The chancel arch is C19.

St Nicholas

Rotherfield Greys
This small aisleless village church with timber bellcote was almost entirely rebuilt in the Victorian era, except for the Jacobean chapel with the magnificent Knollys family tomb.

St Nicholas

Heythrop
St Nicholas was totally rebuilt in the 1870’s, using local stone, by Albert Brassey, who owned Heythrop Park. It is typical of the Victorian gothic style and is in good condition. This church replaced a Norman church, the chancel of which still exists, to the south east in a hidden walled Churchyard, which is opened once a year for a summer ‘Songs of Praise’ service. The old church has a striking west doorway from around 1170.

St Nicholas

Idbury
The church was built in the twelfth century, and every generation since has made their contribution to its upkeep and development. It is built of durable yellowish oolite and roofed with old grey stone slates, with the exception of the flat roof of the nave, once leaded but now covered with Welsh slates. The windows retain their old leaded glazing and iron stanchion bars.

St Nicholas

Islip
Grade I listed.

Late C12 origins. Building materials consist of Limestone
ashlar and rubble with ashlar dressings. The roofs are of Stonesfield-slate and artificial
stone-slate.

Central features include an aisled nave, chancel, north-east vestry, south porch and west
tower.The chancel, of squared coursed rubble, now has C19 windows in Geometrical
Decorated style: a 3-light east window and 2-light windows to north and south,
all with foliage stops to the hood moulds. The hipped-roofed vestry to north
incorporates a small lancet which may be medieval. The narrow south aisle with a
steep double-pitched roof, has a 2-light Decorated east window and 2 similar
windows to south. The porch, with arcaded side windows, is C19 but shelters the
C14 south doorway which has continuous mouldings. The west gable wall of the
aisle contains a small C11/C12 window. The broader north aisle, also with a
steep double-pitched roof, has 4 large 3-light windows with good geometrical
tracery, mostly renewed; the blocked north doorway has continuous wave mouldings
either side of a three-quarter hollow moulding.

The fine ashlar 3-stage C15 tower, with diagonal buttresses and crenellated parapet has a 3-light 4-centre
arched west window, with intersecting tracery and a wide casement moulding,
above a Tudor-arched door with quatrefoils in the spandrels and a label mould;
the top stage has large 2-light bell-chamber openings with Perpendicular tracery
and transoms; the crocketted corner pinnacles have panelled sides.

St Nicholas

Kiddington
The Church of England parish church of Saint Nicholas was Norman, and the original chancel arch survives from this time. The rest of the church was rebuilt about 1400 in the Decorated Gothic style. The chancel was extended westwards so that, unusually amongst parish churches, it has one chancel arch in front of another. The rest of the 14th century rebuilding comprises the nave, a south chapel, south porch and west tower. Later in the Middle Ages a Perpendicular Gothic east window was inserted in the chancel. In 1845 the chancel was rebuilt in its present apsidal form on the original Norman foundations to designs by George Gilbert Scott. In 1848 the Perpendicular Gothic east window was removed and re-used to form sedilia. In 1879 a vestry and organ chamber were added.

The tower has three bells. James Keene of Woodstock cast the tenor bell in 1629. Mears & Stainbank of the Whitechapel Bell Foundry cast the treble bell in 1875. The date and founder of the middle bell are unknown. There is also a smaller bell, now disused, that may have been cast by John Mitchell of Wokingham[16] in about 1493.

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