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Abbey Church of St Peter and St Paul

Dorchester
One of the earliest Christian sites in Britain – has been a centre of Christianity since A.D. 634, when St Birinus began a mission to Wessex. The imposing church is all that remains of an Augustinian abbey, founded in 1140. It was enlarged in the 13th and 14th centuries and restored in the I9th. It has good medieval stained glass, a remarkable Jesse window, and a rare lead font.

Abingdon Baptist Church

Abingdon
Home to one of the oldest Baptist churches in England, dating from the mid 17th century. The present building is around 175 years old.

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Middleton Stoney

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Mollington

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Nuneham Courtenay

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Shorthampton

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Woolstone

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Wytham

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Chilton
The church consists of a nave (built in the 12th century), south aisle (13th century), chancel (14th century), a west tower and a south porch (both 19th century). The walls, which are built of chalk with stone dressings, are plastered internally and rendered externally.

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Churchill

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Coleshill
All Saints Church was built of flint and stone in 1861.

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Aston Upthorpe
Small Mediaeval church , peaceful and charming

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Cuddesdon
The present church in Cuddesdon was built in about 1180 over the foundations of an earlier 12th-century church. It originally had only a single nave; the side aisles were added in 1240. The 14th century saw the roofs of the aisles raised and the addition of the south porch The chancel was rebuilt in the late 14th century and maybe again about 1500.


After the Dissolution of the Monasteries (1538-41), the church was no longer under the care of Abingdon Abbey and began to fall into decay. It was rescued around 1630, when a local builder supervised repairs to the upper part of the tower, the south wall of the south transept, the nave roof, and the pews.

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East Lockinge

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Didcot
The Church is on a site of religious significance, the highest place on the
ridge. A 1200 year old yew tree is close to it. This was the heart of a
Saxon settlement, maybe with a wooden church. The foundations of our
church were laid in 1160.

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Marcham

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Dunsden
Set in open fields, this attractive small church of silver grey brick with stone dressings was built in 1842 by J. Turner, with the chancel added in 1872 by his son J.G. Turner. The poet Wilfred Owen’s parents are buried in the churchyard.

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Mixbury

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Faringdon
A grand cruciform town church, mostly 12th and 13th century, which lost its spire in the Civil War. It has some exceptional stonework and some fine monuments, particularly those to the Unton and Pye families.

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North Moreton
The village is tucked away between Didcot and the Berkshire Downs with a small church containing the most outstanding medieval glass in Oxfordshire. It is to be found in the east window of the south aisle, built as a chantry by Sir Miles Stapleton in 1299. He was killed at Bannock burn in 1314. The survival of the window, largely intact, is remarkable and the glowing colours of the different scenes from the Passion and lives of the saints are still as impressive as they must have been seven hundred years ago.

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Great Bourton

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Headington

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Pusey

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Rotherfield Peppard
This lovely village church, part of which dates back to Norman times, was restored by William Scott Champion in 1874; with the nave almost completely rebuilt and a north aisle added. The tower and shingled broach spire are of 1908.

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Shirburn

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Spelsbury
All Saints Church is a Norman foundation. It was mostly rebuilt in the 18th-century. Parts of the nave date from about 1300. The church is noted for its many memorials, mainly to the Lee Dillons of Ditchley. Lord Rochester, the 17th-century poet of Charles II’s Court, is interred here in the crypt and his and a number of other coffin plates are displayed in the baptistery. There is a ring of 6 bells. Spelsbury lies in rolling countryside in north-west Oxfordshire on the edge of the Cotswolds. There is a good view of the Evenlode valley from the churchyard.

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Sutton Courtenay
A church with work of many different periods, from the Norman tower to a 20th-century trompe-l’oeil portrait. There is a charming two-storied Tudor south porch, made of red brick. The Liberal Prime Minister H. H. Asquith and the writer George Orwell are buried here.
Goosey, All Saints Chapel

All Saints Chapel

Goosey

All Saints Methodist

Abingdon

All Saints Wroxton

Wroxton
This Grade II* listed church dates from the 14th century. Numerous alterations have taken place over time. The Clerestory and aisles are C15; the tower, designed by Sanderson Miller, was rebuilt in 1748 at the expense of Francis, Lord North of Wroxton Abbey. Bodley and Garner undertook a number of restorations in 1885. The church contains a number of fine tomb monuments.

All Souls Chapel

West Lockinge

Anglican Church

Pishill
Overlooking the Stonor valley in the Chiltern Hills, this church was built in 1854 to replace a Norman and later C13 church. Of coursed flint rubble with limestone ashlar quions and dressings, with chancel, nave, north transept and west belfry.

Annunciation of The Blessed Virgin Mary

Souldern
Mainly medieval this attractive small church is in an attractive village setting.

Appleton Mission

Appleton

Assumption of The Blessed Virgin Mary

Beckley

Assumption of The Blessed Virgin Mary

Launton

Banbury United Reform Church

Banbury

Baptist

Drayton

Baptist

Abingdon, Bayworth

Baptist

Hook Norton
The Baptist Church in Hook Norton is one of the oldest in existence, tracing its roots back to the 1640s. Not surprisingly it has an interesting history: the first pastor James Wilmot was imprisoned for six months in 1664 for preaching! In the era before cars, horses and traps would converge on the church from surrounding farms and villages, some people would travel for over an hour on foot for Sunday Worship.

Baptist Chapel

Bayworth

Baptist Chapel

Cote
A Chapel was registered for meetings in 1704 but the present building was built in 1756. It is no longer used for regular worship, but the Churchyard is still open for burials.

Baptist Chapel

Fyfield

Baptist Church

Wallingford
The church was founded in 1794 by Robert Lovegrove, the owner of Calleva House, who had a plain rectangular chapel built at the bottom of his garden, along with an attached schoolroom. Given a Georgian front in 1821 as the membership grew, that front was replicated to permit an extension forward (over the old graveyard) in 1994.





Baptist Church

Wantage

Baptist Church

Woodstock

Baptist Church

Bloxham
There has been a Baptist congregation in Bloxham since 1682. The current Baptist church was built in 1862 and enlarged in 2001.

Baptist Church

Burford

Baptist Church

Wolvercote

Baptist Church

Charlbury