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Holy Ascension

Littleworth
Grade II listed.

C19 origins. Building materials consist of rubble stone with ashlar dressings.

The church is built in Gothic style and includes a three bay nave which is broad and aisleless with a low pitched roof. The chancel is two-bay. Windows are in lancet style and there is also a west facing bellcote. There is also a gabled porch with shafted moulded arch and carved foliage capitals.

Holy Cross

Shipton-on-Cherwell
Shipton had a parish church by the latter part of the 12th century, which seems to have been enlarged in the 13th century and received new windows in the 14th century. It was demolished in 1831 and replaced by a new Georgian Gothic Revival Church of England parish church designed by the artist William Turner who lived at the manor house.Some original materials from the original church were re-used. Crossley and Elrington state that this includes the north porch, which Sherwood and Pevsner had earlier dismissed as “free and flimsy Georgian Gothick”. Holy Cross was restored in 1869 under the direction of the Gothic Revival architect Charles Buckeridge.

The belltower has only two bells.They were cast in the middle of the 16th century and presumably came from the original church.

The original dedication of the 12th-century church was to the Holy Cross. By 1786 the dedication had been changed to Saint Mary, and by 1851 it had been changed to Saint Jerome. By 1892 the church was finally restored to its original dedication of Holy Cross. The parish is now part of the Benefice of Blenheim, which also includes Begbroke, Bladon, Woodstock and Yarnton.

Holy Cross

Sparsholt
The large church is in a pretty village on the edge of the Vale of White Horse. Of special interest are three rare oak effigies of about 1300 depicting a knight and two ladies. They are in the south transept behind an elegant 14th-century screen.

Holy Rood

Woodeaton

Holy Rood

Cuxham

Holy Rood

Oxford

Holy Rood

Shilton
The Church is either Saxon or Norman in origin. It was restored in the Victorian era.

Holy Trinity

Ardington
The oldest part of the Church of England parish church of Holy Trinity is the chancel arch, built about 1200. The Gothic Revival architect Joseph Clarke added the tower and spire in 1856. Somers Clarke remodelled the remainder of the church in 1887.

Holy Trinity

Charlton

Holy Trinity

West Hendred
Grade I listed.
C14 origins. Building materials consist of ashlar stone with irregular flint and stone rubble. Architectural features include chancel, nave and west tower. There is also a stone porch to the centre of the south aisle.
Windows range from C14 to C19 and include original C14 lancets to the left and right of the north aisle.
The tower features a plain parapet.

Interior:
Braced collar truss common-rafter roof to the chancel. C14 tiles on chancel floor.
C18 wood altar rail.
Braced collar truss rafter roof to the nave, with tie beams.
There are fragments of medieval glass to the east window.
The North aisle contains some C15 pews. There is also a hexagonal wood pulpit, which is C17, as is the octagonal stone font. There is a red cross painted on the north wall to the east end of the aisle, and another red cross painted on the south wall.

Holy Trinity

Witney
Holy Trinity Church Woodgreen was designed by B. Ferry and built in 1849. It is of an aisle-less design with a western turret containing one bell, an organ built in 1894 and seated 518 worshippers. The stained glass east window was added in 1919 to the memory of Dr. Christopher Harvey and the choir screen to Mr Richard Gillett. The inside of the building was re-ordered in 2004. It still has its simple and clean character, but it is now an accessible and flexible building

Holy Trinity

Chipping Norton

Holy Trinity

Finstock
Church. 1841, interior “improved and beautified” in 1876, and vestry/organ chamber added in 1906 1905-6 (dated 1905 on rainwater-heads), by S. Slingsby and Stallwood of Reading.

Squared and coursed limestone with additions in dressed limestone, ashlar dressings. Stone slate roofs. Four-bay nave in a lancet style; 2-bay chancel and south vestry/organ chamber in a Decorated Gothick style.

Holy Trinity

Nuffield
A small Norman church remodelled in the early C14 when the North aisle was added, located at one of the highest points in the southern Chilterns, in unknapped flint with stone dressings.

Holy Trinity

Godington
The earliest written record of the parish church is from 1221, when the Abbess of the Benedictine Elstow Abbey in Bedfordshire disputed with a later Richard de Camville which one of them held the advowson of the parish. The Abbey won, and retained the right until its dissolution in 1539. After this the Crown held the advowson until 1608, when it was sold to Sir Henry Fowkes who immediately sold it on to Corpus Christi College, Oxford.

The Fermors were recusants and with their support the majority of Godington parishioners remained Roman Catholic. In 1739 Roman Catholics still outnumbered Anglicans in the parish, and a Roman Catholic priest lived in the parish to serve them. Early in the 19th century it was recorded that the farming families were Catholic but their labourers were Protestant. Until 1900 in the roof of the farmhouse at Moat Farm there was a Roman Catholic chapel that was served by a priest from Hethe. In 1759 it was also recorded that recusants from Godington worshipped at the Fermor family chapel at Tusmore Park.

By 1790 the mediaeval Church of England parish church of the Holy Trinity was in disrepair and in danger of collapse, and in 1792 William Fermor employed a fellow-Roman Catholic to rebuild it. In 1852 the church was restored and rectangular Georgian windows were converted to lancets, and in 1905 the building was restored again. The mediaeval font survives and some mediaeval masonry remains in the bell tower. The tower used to have three bells, but in 1792 two of them were sold to pay for rebuilding the church. The surviving bell was cast in 1717, and there is also a Sanctus bell cast in 1793.

Holy Trinity

Over Worton
Rebuilt 1844 incorporating some medieval work by J. Derrick for Revd. William Wilson.Marlstone ashlar with some limestone dressings; Westmorland-slate roofs.

Chancel, 3-bay nave and south aisle, south porch and north tower. C19 chancel in C13 style has 3 grouped lancets to east, and a single lancet to north and south, all with hood moulds and carved stops.

Walling and parapets of south aisle and nave may be medieval but windows are restored: 2-light reticulated at east end of aisle; 2-light geometrical to east and west of porch; a large 3-light window with intersecting tracery at the west end of the nave where the former tower stood.

The parapets have some medieval gargoyles at the angles. The south porch has a large shield-shaped sundial and a foliated gable cross. North side of nave has a large C19 window of 3 lights with flowing tracery.

Massive 3-stage tower of 1849, in a mixed romanesque and C14 style, has tall traceried openings to the bell chamber.

Interior: chancel east window is set within 7 graduated lancets with detached shafts and dog-tooth ornament, the outer lancets containing the Decalogue etc. 6-canted chancel roof has moulded ribs with carved foliage bosses and a carved frieze. Trefoil-headed piscina and sedilia may be C13. Oak chancel fittings have traceried panels and carved poppy heads. C19 encaustic-tile floor. Chancel arch has 2 chamfered orders with contrasting voussoirs and springs from moulded corbels. C19 nave arcade in C13 style has carved head stops. Nave roof trusses have traceried spandrels above braced cambered tie beams. Octagonal C19 font has carved roundels of foliage. Stained glass in chancel by Clutterbruck (1845); at west end of nave by Camm Bros. (c.l878). Elaborate organ case with reticulated tracery. C17 full-length effigy in legal robes retains much colouring and may be Edmund Meese (died 1617) whose memorial tablet is set in the west wall. J.H. Newman, later Cardinal, preached his first sermon in the church. (V.C.H.: Oxfordshire, Vol.XI, p.300; Buildings of England: Oxfordshire, p.750).

Holy Trinity

Headington Quarry
The Church of England parish church of the Holy Trinity was designed by George Gilbert Scott and built in 1848–49.The east window of its chancel was designed by Ninian Comper.The Friends of Holy Trinity Church was founded in 2002 to raise funds and look after the church. In 1930, C. S. Lewis, Oxford academic and author of The Chronicles of Narnia, and his brother Warnie moved, with Mrs Janie Moore and her daughter Maureen, into “The Kilns”, a house on the outskirts of Headington Quarry. Lewis attended Holy Trinity Church. He first preached there on 29 March 1942, on the subject of “Religion and pleasure”, and he is buried in the churchyard.

Holy Trinity

Henley-on-Thames
The church was constructed in 1848 by Benjamin Ferry, and consists of flint with stone detailing. In 1891 a vestry, baptistry and aisles were added and the churchyard area was expanded. Externally there has been little alteration since the C19.

Holy Trinity

Shenington
A large,light airy church with a high 16th century tower facing the squat little church of Alkerton on the opposite sided of the valley.

Holy Trinity

Sibford Gower
Built in 1840 by H.J. Underwood. Porch added in 1897 by W.E. Mills of Banbury. Squared, coursed ironstone. Slate roof. Stone coped gable. Cruciform plan. Early English style. Lancets and triplets of lancets. Gabled stone porch.
Gabled stone bellcore on west end.

Holy Trinity

Lew
Holy Trinity was designed in a 13th-century style by the architect William Wilkinson and built in 1841.[8]

Holy Trinity

Ascott-u-Wychwood

Holy Trinity RC

Hethe

Horspath Methodist

Horspath

Independent Chapel

Stoke Row
The Chapel was built in 1815 (since modernised) but there were meetings of dissenters recorded as being held in the C17 in a local farmhouse. The Chapel was built in Flemish bond red brick on flint footings. The roof is slate hipped with overhanging eaves.

John Bunyan Baptist Church

Cowley

Kennington Methodist Church

Kennington
Built in 1967, it is the newest of the three churches in the village
Longcot Chapel

Longcot Chapel

Longcot
Built c.1843, this small chapel is of chequered red and blue brick with decorated clay tiles surrounding the doorway. Joint ecumenical services are held in the chapel which was recently refurbished, and it is also used for a variety of community activities.

Marlborough Rd Methodist Church

Banbury

Marston United Reformed Church

New Marston

Methodist

Wigginton

Methodist

Milton, Abingdon
Milton Methodist Church is a modern building with good facilities, car parking and a large paddock at the rear which makes it an ideal venue for some circuit events; it is now the base for “Hope”, the motorhome for the Circuit’s Community Chaplains.

Methodist Chapel

Middle Barton

Methodist Chapel

Banbury
Wigginton Methodist Church is part of the Chipping Norton and Stow on the Wold Methodist Circuit.

Methodist Chapel

Churchill
The Methodist Church (more often called The Chapel) was opened at Easter 1927 by Richard Cadbury of chocolate fame, on a site donated by David Crudge, a local farmer. The stone came from Chadlington. The iron gates were made by Charles Blake the village blacksmith and the chairs were made from trees grown in Churchill. Designed by WG Eaton of Witney in stone and with striking lancet windows.

Methodist Chapel

Combe

Methodist Chapel

Cropredy
The Methodist Chapel was built in 1881 following the Wesley revival and remains a focal point of Village affairs. Designed by Edward Pincher of West Bromwich using mainly ironstone and with Gothic west front and turrets.

Methodist Chapel

Hornton
Non-conformist groups in Hornton included Baptists in the 17th century and Quakers in the 17th and 18th centuries. Hornton had a Primitive Methodist congregation by 1836, which had built its own chapel by 1842. Hornton’s present Methodist church was built in 1884.

Methodist Chapel

Sutton
The Wesleyan Chapel and School Room was built in the late 1890s.

Methodist Church

Tackley

Methodist Church

Bampton
The foundations of this Chapel were laid in September 1891 by a group of Methodist Trustees who were meeting in the disused workhouse at Weald and which included members of the Early family of Witney.The building was completed and opened on 25th March 1892. Described as meeting Bampton’s “spiritual destitution”, it was built in stone and slate with a four-light traceried window in front and lancets at the side.

Methodist Church

Wallingford
Methodism in Wallingford has a long history. The founder of Methodism, John Wesley, visited the town on at least 4 occasions. The present Church building, in St Leonards Square was built in 1873. The premises have been modernised and extended in recent years, to serve a growing congregation and for community use.

Methodist Church

Woodstock

Methodist Church

Wantage
The original, smaller chapel was built in 1845 and has been altered and extended over the years. During a renovation in 1881 pews, a pulpit, singing gallery and gas lighting were installed. An organ had been in place since sometime between 1866 and 1872. A major refurbishment was undertaken in 2015.

Methodist Church

Great Milton
The church was established in 1842 as a Wesleyan chapel.

Methodist Church

Watlington
Charles Wesley preached here but the Methodist Church itself was not built until 1812 in red brick with rounded windows, and front partly obscured by later proch.

Methodist Church

Bladon
The Methodist congregation very quickly outgrew the small chapel built in 1843 (and this became the School Room).Thus in 1870s a new building was provided on an adjoining plot of land. This new building costing £500 was largely subscribed by agricultural labourers. Later additions to the building, included the erection of a vestry and kitchen, followed by a complete refurbishment in 1970s.

Methodist Church

Bodicote

Methodist Church

Burford

Methodist Church

Chadlington

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