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Holy Rood

Oxford

Holy Rood

Shilton
The Church is either Saxon or Norman in origin. It was restored in the Victorian era.

Holy Trinity

Ardington

Holy Trinity

Charlton

Holy Trinity

West Hendred

Holy Trinity

Witney
Holy Trinity Church Woodgreen was designed by B. Ferry and built in 1849. It is of an aisle-less design with a western turret containing one bell, an organ built in 1894 and seated 518 worshippers. The stained glass east window was added in 1919 to the memory of Dr. Christopher Harvey and the choir screen to Mr Richard Gillett. The inside of the building was re-ordered in 2004. It still has its simple and clean character, but it is now an accessible and flexible building

Holy Trinity

Chipping Norton

Holy Trinity

Finstock
Church. 1841, interior “improved and beautified” in 1876, and vestry/organ chamber added in 1906 1905-6 (dated 1905 on rainwater-heads), by S. Slingsby and Stallwood of Reading.

Squared and coursed limestone with additions in dressed limestone, ashlar dressings. Stone slate roofs. Four-bay nave in a lancet style; 2-bay chancel and south vestry/organ chamber in a Decorated Gothick style.

Holy Trinity

Nuffield
A small Norman church remodelled in the early C14 when the North aisle was added, located at one of the highest points in the southern Chilterns, in unknapped flint with stone dressings.

Holy Trinity

Godington

Holy Trinity

Over Worton

Holy Trinity

Headington Quarry

Holy Trinity

Henley-on-Thames
The church was constructed in 1848 by Benjamin Ferry, and consists of flint with stone detailing. In 1891 a vestry, baptistry and aisles were added and the churchyard area was expanded. Externally there has been little alteration since the C19.

Holy Trinity

Shenington
A large,light airy church with a high 16th century tower facing the squat little church of Alkerton on the opposite sided of the valley.

Holy Trinity

Sibford Gower

Holy Trinity

Lew
Holy Trinity was designed in a 13th-century style by the architect William Wilkinson and built in 1841.[8]

Holy Trinity

Ascott-u-Wychwood

Holy Trinity RC

Hethe

Horspath Methodist

Horspath

Independent Chapel

Stoke Row
The Chapel was built in 1815 (since modernised) but there were meetings of dissenters recorded as being held in the C17 in a local farmhouse. The Chapel was built in Flemish bond red brick on flint footings. The roof is slate hipped with overhanging eaves.

John Bunyan Baptist Church

Cowley

Kennington Methodist Church

Kennington
Longcot Chapel

Longcot Chapel

Longcot

Marlborough Rd Methodist Church

Banbury

Marston United Reformed Church

New Marston

Methodist

Wigginton

Methodist Chapel

Middle Barton

Methodist Chapel

Churchill

Methodist Chapel

Combe

Methodist Chapel

Cropredy

Methodist Chapel

Hornton
Non-conformist groups in Hornton included Baptists in the 17th century and Quakers in the 17th and 18th centuries. Hornton had a Primitive Methodist congregation by 1836, which had built its own chapel by 1842. Hornton’s present Methodist church was built in 1884.

Methodist Chapel

Sutton
The Wesleyan Chapel and School Room was built in the late 1890s.

Methodist Church

Tackley

Methodist Church

Bampton

Methodist Church

Wallingford
Methodism in Wallingford has a long history. The founder of Methodism, John Wesley, visited the town on at least 4 occasions. The present Church building, in St Leonards Square was built in 1873. The premises have been modernised and extended in recent years, to serve a growing congregation and for community use.

Methodist Church

Woodstock

Methodist Church

Wantage

Methodist Church

Great Milton

Methodist Church

Watlington

Methodist Church

Bladon

Methodist Church

Bodicote

Methodist Church

Burford

Methodist Church

Chadlington

Methodist Church

Charlbury

Methodist Church

Chipping Norton

Methodist Church

Cowley

Methodist Church

Long Hanborough
The church was built in 1895 of coursed rubble with ashlar quoins. It is oriented north–south, with the north end facing the main road. Below the north window, which has 14th-century style intersecting tracery, there is a datestone. The name of the architect is unknown. In 1901 a schoolroom, in similar style, was attached to the building at the southeast corner.

In 1970–1 a kitchen, store room, meeting room and toilets were added to the south end of the church in a flat-roofed extension. There are (in 2014) plans afoot to demolish the extension, which is in poor repair and no longer considered suitable for modern needs, and replace it with another, single-story extension, which will be more energy efficient and create a more flexible space.

Methodist Church

Didcot
Didcot Methodist Church dates from 1903 on land given by Lady
Wantage for the sum of one shilling. It is the only church in the centre of
town up a slight bank overlooking Broadway and the main shopping area.
The church has strong links to the local Churches Together and other
organisations in the local community.

Methodist Church

Milton, Abingdon

Methodist Church

Bicester