• Denomination

  • Style

  • Clear all search and filter

SS Mary and Nicholas

Littlemore

SS Nicholas and Swithun

Yelford

SS Peter & Paul

Appleford

SS Peter and Paul

Wantage

SS Peter and Paul

Botley
Botley’s Church of England church of St Peter and St Paul on West Way, built in 1958 is one of four in its benefice which reaches outside the historic ecclesiastical parish to include St. Frideswide, Oxford and St. Margaret of Antioch, Binsey and has close ties to other denominations including the Calvery Chapel, the Botley Baptist and Roman Catholic Churches.

SS Peter and Paul

Broadwell

SS Peter and Paul

Church Hanborough
The Church of England parish church of Saints Peter and Paul was built before 1130, when Henry I granted its advowson to Reading Abbey, which he had founded nine years earlier. Surviving 12th century features include Norman tympanum of the north door, which is a relief of Saint Peter with the Lamb of God and the lion of Saint Mark. Early in the 13th century the chancel and chancel arch were rebuilt, the north chapel was extended eastwards, the height of the aisles was increased, the north and south porches were added and a west tower was built.

SS Peter and Paul

Shiplake
This ancient church dating from 1229, overlooks the Thames valley and is Grade 1 listed. Part of the south aisle and tower are medieval, the rest of the church was rebuilt by G.E. Street 1868/70.

SS Peter and Paul

Steeple Aston

SS Philip and James

Oxford

SS Thomas More & John Fisher

Burford
A modern building

St Agatha

Brightwell-cum-Sotwell
Sitting comfortably in its village environment below Wittenham Clumps, St Agatha’s was built in 1153 by the Bishop of Winchester, Henri de Blois, on land he owned at Brightwell and on which Brightwell Castle stood. Now a Grade II* listed building, it illustrates various architectural styles which have occurred over the last nine centuries.

St Alban

Cowley

St Aldates

Oxford

St Amand

East Hendred

St Andrew

Wheatfield
This church is surrounded by parkland, the neighbouring manor house having been burnt down in 1814. Originally 14th century, it was remodelled in the 18th. All the furnishings are Georgian, including the font, pulpit and box pews.

St Andrew

Chinnor

St Andrew

East Hagbourne
Very fine late Mediaeval parish church

St Andrew

Oxford
A typical standard suburban church of 1905, St Andrew’s is not listed, with reason.

St Andrew

Great Rollright
Picturesque church with richly carved south aisle and porch. Late C12, restored 1852 by G.E. Street. Roughcast limestone rubble with limestone-ashlar dressings; limestone ashlar; copper roofs.

St Andrew

Sandford-on-Thames
Shrivenham, St Andrew

St Andrew

Shrivenham
A very unusual church, well worth a visit. The fine 15th-century tower remains but the rest of the church was rebuilt in the 17th century, with the tower coming out of the middle like a tent pole. Inside, the pillars are fatter at the top than the bottom, which looks very odd. There are some good monuments to the Barrington family and a fine ‘perspective’ pulpit and tester from the 17th century.

St Andrew

Kingham
There has been a church on the site for at least 900 years. The font is 13th century; the tower is 15th century. The nave roof, dated 1774, has carved and gilded wooden bosses. The rest of the church was re-modeled in 1851-3 in Decorated style.

Outside in the north wall of the chancel there is a 14th century canopied tomb recess enclosing a slab with a foliated cross. Possibly the tomb of Ralph de Chasteleyn said to be the founder of the church. He died in 1336 as a result of wounds received in a dispute between his family of Kingham and the de Nowers family of Churchill.

The furnishings, apart from the font, are of the 1850s. The church’s most remarked on feature is in its pews. “These have unusual traceried bench-ends of locally carved pale composition stone with spikey poppy heads.” Pevsner. The altar table has painted panels of saints with angels carrying the instruments of Christ’s passion above.

St Andrew

Letcombe Regis

St Andrew

South Stoke
St Andrew’s Church, South Stoke, was built in the early 1200s although it is believed there may have been an earlier church. It is one of the most beautiful churches in the district with a large and well-kept churchyard. The Parish of South Stoke cum Woodcote is believed to have been founded in Anglo-Saxon times, possibly by St. Birinus. In 1984 South Stoke became a separate parish in The United Benefice of Goring with South Stoke.

St Andrew and All Angels

Oddington

St Andrew's

Dean Court

St Andrews

Headington
St Andrew’s Church is Headington’s oldest surviving building. Some parts of it date from the twelfth century, and it is thought to have been established by Hugh de Pluggenait, who was Lord of the Manor of Headingon from 1142 to 1201; but there was probably already a small Saxon building on this site.

St Anne

Epwell
The building is 13th century with later windows and an unusual 14th century tower which also forms the porch.

St Anthony of Padua

Headington
The Church of St Anthony of Padua, Oxford is a yellow brick-built Catholic church in suburb of Headington, east Oxford, Oxfordshire, England. The church building is located in Headley Way.

The church was built in 1960 and designed by Jennings, Homer & Lynch. J.R.R. Tolkien was a parishioner here when he lived in Sandfield Road nearby. He was also a benefactor and a Requiem Mass was held here in his honour on 6 September 1973.

St Augustine of Canterbury

East Hendred

St Barnabas

Oxford
Grade1 listed church. Architect A W Bloomfield. Built at the expense of Thomas Combe a supporter of the Oxford Movement. The dominant feature of the church is the raised high altar with gilded canopy. The fine murals on the north wall of the nave are made of cut glass in a technique known as “opus sectile”.

St Barnabas

Horton-cum-Studley

St Bartholomew

Yarnton

St Bartholomew

Brightwell Baldwin

St Bartholomew

Nettlebed
This church is situated in attractive wooded countryside of the Chilterns on high land in the village of Nettlebed on the Henley on Thames to Wallingford road. It replaced an earlier church on the site, and was completed in 1846.

St Bartholomew

Holton

St Bartholomew

Ducklington
12th Century Church with 13th and 15th Century addtions. Some very fine windows. Unique North aisle. A good example of an open cantilever roof. The North Aisle, remodelled in the 14th Century in the Decorated style, is the showpiece of the church

St Bartholomew Chapel

Goring Heath
Set in tranquil grounds, this small chapel is part of a fine C18 group of almshouses, situated at the end of a short avenue in woodland outside the village of Goring Heath within the Chilterns Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. The chapel, together with the almshouses, was built in 1724 by Henry Alnutt, a lawyer from London.

St Birinus

Dorchester
Grade II* listed. This was one of the first churches to be built after the Catholic Emancipation Act of 1829

St Blaise

Milton, Abingdon

St Botolph

Swyncombe
Beautifully placed in the Chilterns is this largely untouched small Norman church, built of flint and stone. In the semi-circular apse are traces of early wall-painting.

St Britius

Brize Norton

St Catherine

Towersey

St Clement

Oxford

St Columba

Oxford

St Cross

Oxford

St Denys

Northmoor
In a rural situation near Matthew Arnold’s ‘stripling Thames’ between Bablock Hythe and Newbridge, the church is an almost unaltered example of the Decorated style of the early 14th century, with two wide transepts and much good window tracery. The 17th-century Laudian altar rails are of unusual quality and were given to St John’s College, the patrons of St Denys’ Church, by Archbishop Laud.

St Denys

Stanford-in-the-Vale

St Denys

Little Compton