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St James

Nether Worton
A hidden jewel.

St James

Over Norton
An old chapel badly in need of repair

St James

Ramsden
Church. 1872, by A.W. Blomfield.

Dressed limestone with ashlar dressings, including bands in gable ends and internally. Stone slate roofs. Four-bay nave, lean-to south aisle, 2-bay chancel with south vestry and north-west steeple over porch. In an Early English/Decorated Gothic style. Steeple: two stages externally. Double-chamfered plinth, clasping buttresses to lower stage with chamfered offsets to pilaster buttresses to belfry, chamfered offset to belfry with continuous impost moulding and corbelled eaves band, and broach spire with moulded cornice, hipped lucarnes to cardinal faces with louvred chamfered lancet openings, finials and continuous cill string, and finial at apex. Belfry openings of 2 louvred trefoil-headed lights with quatrefoil plate tracery, each set in chamfered recess with double-chamfered shallow pointed-arched head. First stage with pairs of trefoil-headed chamfered lancets to east and west, which each have decorative triangular-pattern stonework in relieving arch over; pair of small chamfered lancets to north. Pair of boarded north doors with wrought-iron strap hinges, moulded archway and hood mould with carved foliate stops. Cast-iron bootscrapers. Clock in front of belfry openings to north. Interior of porch has chamfered rear arch to door, stone side benches beneath windows with chamfered square surrounds and central chamfered corbel projections between with broach stops and boarded door to nave with strap hinges and continuously-chamfered and ovolo-moulded archway; encaustic-tiled floor and chamfered cross-beamed ceiling. Nave: chamfered plinth, buttresses with chamfered offsets, chamfered stone eaves and parapeted gable ends with finials at apices, cross-to west. North side: left-hand buttress has gabled top with blind trefoiled circular panel and finial. Windows of 2 trefoil-headed lights with quatrefoils in tracery, hollow-chamfered reveals and returned hood moulds. West end: central buttress with chamfered offsets and gabled top with blind trefoiled circular panel and finial. Two tall windows of 2 trefoil-headed lights with cusped tracery, chamfered reveals and hood moulds with carved foliate stops. South aisle: chamfered plinth, flush cill band and chamfered stone eaves. Two- and 3-light windows with squat trefoil-headed lancet lights; west window of 2 trefoil-headed lights with cusped plate tracery and hood mould with carved foliate stops. Chancel: chamfered plinth (double to east), buttresses with chamfered offsets (clasping to east), cill string, chamfered stone eaves, and parapeted gable end with coping and finial at apex (probably truncated cross). North-west window of 2 chamfered lancet lights with carved trefoiled chamfered circular panel in tympanum and round relieving arch. East end: window of S stepped trefoil-headed lights with quatrefoils and cinquefoil in tracery, chamfered reveals and hood mould with carved foliate stops. Vestry: chamfered plinth and parapeted gable to front with coping and integral stone stack at apex consisting of chamfered offset to octagonal shaft with cap. South window of 2 trefoil-headed lights with quatrefoil in tracery, chamfered reveals and returned hood mould. Trefoil-headed chamfered lancet to east and boarded door to its left with chamfered Caernarvon arch and segmental relieving arch.

Interior: dressed stone with ashlar bands. Four-bay nave roof with arched-braced collar trusses springing from stone corbels, intermediate smaller arched-braced collar trusses springing from stone corbels higher up, trussed rafters between with collars, moulded wooden wall plate, ashlar pieces and 3 purlins each side. South aisle arcade consisting of circular piers with moulded bases and capitals (semi-circular end piers) and double-chamfered arches. Nave windows and door with chamfered rear arches and aisle windows with chamfered wooden lintels. Chamfered chancel arch with continuous outer sunk chamfer and half-octagonal piers with moulded bases and capitals. Two-bay chancel roof (one long bay and one short bay) has 2 arched-braced collar trusses with moulded tie-stubs on wooden brackets, intermediate arched-braced truss to east, trussed rafters between with collars, moulded wooden wall plate, ashlar pieces and single purlins. Ashlar dado with cill string, stepped up to east. East window has clustered nook shafts with moulded bases and capitals, chamfered rear arch and hood mould with carved foliate stops; north window with clustered nook shafts and chamfered trefoil rear arch. Continuous double-chamfered vestry/organ arch, with moulded imposts to outer chamfer. Stone sedilia to south with hollow-chamfered arched head and 2 seats divided by stone arm-rests. Double-chamfered arched aumbry to north, the inner chamfer dying into responds, with projecting cill. Lean-to aisle roof with purlins and arched braced trusses. Double-chamfered archway at east end of aisle, the inner chamfer resting on moulded brackets and the outer chamfer dying into responds. Vestry with segmental-arched corner fireplace and chamfered trefoil-arched piscina to south with projecting scalloped bowl. Mainly late C19 fittings: marble reredos of 1872 consisting of cross set in mosiac in central arch, flanking lozenge panels with carved figures, bracketed cill and moulded top; brass plaque on south wall of nave inscribed: “TO THE GLORY OF GOD AND/IN AFFECTIONATE MEMORY OF MARY/KATHERINE WIFE OF R. LOWBRIDGE/BAKER VICAR OF THIS PARISH/THIS REREDOS IS PLACED BY MANY/FRIENDS WHO LOVED HER DEEPLY/A.D. 1872”. Wrought-iron altar rails with wooden rail. Plain choir stalls with wrought-iron frontals. Organ with painted pipes. Oak chancel screen dated 1932 with stone base, 3:3 lights with pierced cinquefoil heads, and moulded top rail with cresting; inscription to base: (left-hand side) “TO THE GLORY OF GOD AND IN MEMORY OF HENRIETTA MARIA. WIFE OF REV. ROBERT LOWBRIDGE BAKER/(right-hand side) “DIED 25 FEBRUARY 1932 AND HER DAUGHTER MARJORIE EMILY WHO DIED 23 FEBRUARY 1932”. Polygonal wooden pulpit with pierced quatrefoils. Wrought-iron lectern. Plain pews. Stone font at west end of nave with square base, circular stem with 4 marble shafts, each with moulded base and carved capital, square bowl with billet ornament to sides and circular lead bowl and circular iron-bound wooden cover. Encaustic tiles to chancel. Stained glass in Past window, north windows and some aisle windows; Faith, Hope and Charity north windows are a memorial to the Reverend Lowbridge Baker. Monuments: date tablet in memory of William Buckingham (d.1914-18 war), carved by Levi Dore, the village craftsman who also designed and built the war memorial (q.v.). The Reverend Robert Lowbridge Baker was the first vicar of Ramsden and gave the tower; spire and bells in memory of his first wife who died on the eve of the opening of the church. The church cost £1,886 and the tower, spire and bells cost £639 (accounts). The church opened on Friday 26th April 1872. The builder was Groves of Milton under Wychwood. (Buildings of England: Oxfordshire: p734; Kelly’s Directory of Oxfordshire: 1911: pp308-9)

St James

Somerton
The Church of St James in Somerton stands on a knoll to the south of one of the tracks leading down from the tableland to the east to the water meadows along the Cherwell. The church is unusually large and imposing for what has never been a large village. It contains remarkable monuments and has architectural elements from every century between the eleventh and the sixteenth. It is listed as Grade 1.

St James

Denchworth

St James Great

Stonesfield
St James the Great was built in the early 13th century and contains some fine Early English work. The west tower was heightened in the 15th century and contains a ring of six bells. It is still a prominent landmark. The church is roofed with Stonesfield slates, mined in the village.

St James the Great

West Hanney
A Norman church built on the site of a Saxon church from which two stone coffins remain in the Porch, the Inner Arch is an excellent example of Norman Carving of a Chevron pattern. There is a fine Norman period font and on the North wall a Memorial Tablet to Elizabeth Bowles who died in 1718 at age 124.
A beautiful Window of Christ in Glory, surrounded by five Saints and two Gallipoli Veterans commemorates the 1914-1918 War.

St James the Great

Claydon
An attractive little church with a saddleback tower and Norman doorway on the Northamptonshire border.

St James The Great

Fulbrook
The church is Norman with traces of earlier Saxon work. The North aisle was added about 1200AD and the porch in the late 13th Century.

St James the Great

Radley
Grade II* listed.
C13 origins with C20 restorations.
Building materials consist of uncoursed limestone rubble with ashlar dressings and an ashlar tower. The east wall is partly rendered with roughcast. Roofs are of artificial stone slate.
Features include a C14 chancel and two-bay nave, with a south aisle and transept. There is also a north aisle with transept. The west tower is C15.
Windows date from C15 and include various examples of two and three light designs with ‘Y’ tracery.
There is also a late C19 timber porch.

Interior:
Late C18/C19 fixtures and fittings with a C13 piscina.

St James the Great

South Leigh
Most of the existing church is late 15th Century, built on a Norman site. There are several fine medieval wall paintings and some very old stained glass. The font dates to the 15th Century.

St John

Barford St John
The church was originally built in about 1150 although only the south doorway and the font survive from this period. The chancel was rebuilt in the 13th century, and the Decorated Gothic windows in the nave were added in the 14th century. The church was rebuilt in 1860/61 and the tower was demolished and rebuilt over the south porch.

St John

Kidlington

St John Baptist

Bodicote

St John Baptist

Whitchurch Hill
The church was designed by Francis Bacon of Highclere and built by Wheelers of Reading in 1883. It was built of flint and stone with lancet windows, the chancel and nave in one with the apsidal east end.

St John Baptist

Moulsford
Early 12th Century chapel pulled down and rebuilt in 1847 under the direction of Gilbert Scott with the exception of the West Wall, West Window and structure of the Tower. A major refurbishment of the inside of the church was completed in October, 2013

St John Baptist

Grove
The church was built in 1890 and refurbished in 2014

St John Baptist

Kidmore End
An attractive church of 1852 in the C13 style by Arthur Billing.

St John Baptist

South Moreton
Heavily restored mediaeval parish church in attractive location


St John Baptist

Stadhampton
Grade II listed.
C15 and C16 origins with C19 modifications.
Building materials consist of limestone rubble with ashlar dressings. The roofs are old plain tile.
Features include a C16 chancel, nave, north aisle, aisled nave and west tower.
Windows range from C16 to C19 and include various examples of two and three light designs with different styles of tracery.
Parapets are all C19 and are gabled.

Interior:
C15 chancel arch with three bay north arcade and octagonal piers. Plain C19 roofs.
There is also a C12 tub font.

St John Baptist

Stanton St John
Grade II listed building with richly decorated early C14 chancel, fine pulpit, poppyhead pews and some good medieval glass

St John Evangelist

Taynton
The church dates from about 1450AD, but many of the architectural features are reminiscient of the earlier Decorated style. The church contains a wonderful collection of sculptured heads which are the work of 15th Century stone masons.

St John Evangelist

Carterton
A modern, 1950s church, with 1990s addition.

St John Evangelist

Little Tew
In 1845 the Baptists built a small chapel and in 1853 the Church of England completed the chapel of Saint John the Evangelist, designed by the Gothic Revival architect G.E. Street in an early-14th-century style. It has a tower with a gabled roof and a chime of eight bells. St. John’s was a chapel of ease of the parish of Great Tew until 1857, when Little Tew was made a separate ecclesiastical parish.

St John Evangelist

Milton, Banbury
Grade II listed.

Built C19 by Franklins and Hopcrafts of Deddington.

Building materials consist of regular coursed ironstone rubble and limestone dressings, with a steeply pitched pain tile roof.

Central features include a chancel, nave, and central tower. The windows are in Decorated/Gothic Revival style and contain examples of three and two light windows with intersecting tracery.

The tower is three storeys high and features a plain tile pyramidal roof.

St John Evangelist

New Hinksey
Built in 1900 and designed by Bucknall the architect with Sir Ninian Comper

St John Evangelist

Hailey
Designed in 1869 by the young architect Clapton Crabb Rolfe. The Church has a strangely-shaped bell turret.

St John Evangelist Chapel

Fernham
The Church of England parish church of Saint John the Evangelist was designed in 13th century style by the Gothic Revival architect J.W. Hugall and built in 1861 as a chapel of ease for Longcot. St. John’s parish is now part of a single Church of England Benefice with the parishes of Ashbury, Bourton, Compton Beauchamp, Longcot, Shrivenham and Watchfield. In 2008 the parish controversially spent a £90,000 grant from the Big Lottery Fund to strip St. John’s of its Victorian pews, lay a modern floor and reorder its interior for secular uses as a village hall.

St John the Baptist

Fifield
Early C13 with C14 tower and porch; nave partly rebuilt 1840; restored in 1897 by T. Colcutt who added north vestry.

St John the Baptist

Kingston Lisle
Grade II listed
Anglican
Built c.1200 this small rectangular church with simple nave and chancel contains 14th Century wall paintings depicting Peter, Paul, Herod and Salomé, stained glass and 15th-17th Century bench ends, panelling, pulpit and rood screen. During the Victorian era, the porch and bellcote were added and the vestry extended. Pevsner noted the “splendid iron hinge work c.1200” on the main door.

St John The Baptist

Burford
Grand wool church in graveyard full of bale tombs.

St John the Baptist

Kidlington
St John’s is a Hall Church, built in 1957-58, the completed church was dedicated on 24th October 1959.

St John the Baptist

Curbridge
An early 20th century building. It has remarkable green painted pews and red, black and white decoration against a background of whitewashed walls.

St John The Baptist

Hornton
Norman north arcade, but the rest a century later.Small perpendicular tower.

The wall paintings , Doom, and Norman Font are the main items to look at.

St John the Baptist

Kingston Bagpuize

St John the Evangelist

Wallingford
The Church of St John the Evangelist is a Roman Catholic community based in Wallingford that also enjoys a strong relationship with the sister community of the English Martyrs Church in Didcot.

St John the Evangelist

Oxford

St John the Evangelist

Hempton
Hempton Church was built on land purchased in 1850 to the cost and design of Rev Willian Wilson of Over Worton. Over Worton also presented the Norman font which stands at the back of the Church. Part of the Church was used for the village school, this is now the Church Hall and is used for social events. The roof over the altar on the inside has a nice decorative material.

St John the Evangelist

Stoke Row
Located in the centre of the village amongst the south Chiltern hills, this church was built in 1846 by R.C. Hussey of knapped flint with stone pillars instead of the usual flint and brick buildings in other parts of the area. With a Welsh slate roof and a North Tower; early English Lancet style.

St John Vianney

Wantage
The foundation stone was laid in 1959 and the church opened on 1st October 1961. Simplicity of line is the keynote of this church. The exterior wall is of hand-made multi-red bricks with a Flemish bond, the interior wall of fine texture red bricks in English bond. The roof is of strip aluminium and the interior ceiling of treated cedar in contrasting toned strips.

St John’s

Banbury

St Joseph

Thame

St Joseph

Carterton
St Joseph’s Church in Carterton started out as a threshing barn around two hundred years ago.

St Joseph the Worker

Banbury

St Katherine

Chislehampton

St Kenelm

Minster Lovell
St Kenelm’s Church was built in the 1450s. Highlights include an alabaster tomb to the 7th Baron Lovell who built the church, a nicely carved 15th Century font and original 15th century seating in the nave. A fine reredos behind the altar.

St Kenelm

Enstone
A substantial well maintained and architecturally interesting Grade 2* medieval building on a saxon site partly restored by George Street in the 19th Century.

The first building must have existed before 830 AD and some small Saxon remains can still be seen. The main Norman building was the nave and South doorway; the North aisle is early English and the South aisle 14th Century; tower, chancel, clerestory and porch are all of the Perpendicular period i.e. 15th Century. The Lady Chapel on the South side of the church is Tudor. There is a 16th Century priest’s chamber over the South porch. There are six bells. In 1856 there was a complete restoration under the well-known architect, George Edmund Street.

St Laurence

Appleton
The oldest parts of the Church of England parish church of Saint Laurence are 12th century Norman. The north aisle was added late in that century, linked with the nave by a four-bay arcade of pointed arches. In the 13th century a new window and doorway were inserted in the south wall of the nave, as was the priest’s doorway on the south side of the chancel. The east window of the chancel is 14th century in style.In the 15th century the Perpendicular Gothic bell tower was added, a window inserted on the south side of the nave and the nave was re-roofed. The south porch was added early in the 16th century, the north aisle was rebuilt in the 17th century and the north porch was built in about 1700. The Gothic Revival architect C.C. Rolfe restored the nave in 1882–84. The church is a Grade II* listed building

St Laurence

Warborough

St Laurence

West Challow
Grade II* listed.
This church is of late C12 origin. Building materials consist of roughcast over limestone walling with limestone ashlar dressings. The roof is of stone slate. Features include a late C13 chancel and also a nave.
Windows range from C13 to C15.
Later restorations were carried out on the limestone rubble wall that supports the porch during C19.

Interior:
The chancel features two corbels for statues. There is also a piscina which was restored during C19 and a C15 chancel screen. The pulpits dates from C17 whilst the font is C13.

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