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St Lawrence

Toot Baldon
Grade II* listed.
Origins late C12/early C13 but restored during C19. Building materials consist of limestone rubble with ashlar dressings. Roofs are of plain tile.
Architectural features include an aisled nave, chancel, north transept and south porch.
Windows date from early C13 and include original lancets in the chancel, although these may be reset as the chancel is almost completely rebuilt.
The north wall of the nave features a Romanesque doorway and a two-light C15 window. The vestry is C19 and extends the north aisle.

Interior:
The chancel contains a painted arcade and C19 oak fittings with a C13 style screen. The north arcade contains C13 stiff leaf capitals.

St Lawrence

Tubney

St Lawrence

Besselsleigh

St Lawrence

North Hinksey
Grade II* listed.


C12 origin.


Building materials consist of uncoursed limestone rubble with ashlar dressings and gabled stone-slate roofs.
Features include an early C13 tower, chancel and nave.
Windows date from C13-C16 and include a C13 pointed Norman lancet to the South and a restored C14 lancet to the north. C15-C16 windows contain three and four light designs and also examples of lozenge tracery.
A C17 porch is another interesting feature with a chamfered oak frame. The south door is C12 and has zig-zag carving to a roll-moulded arch.

Interior:

C12 niche for piscina. The chancel arch was restored in C19. Other fixtures and fittings are C19 and C20. There is a C15 octagonal stone font in Decorated style.

St Lawrence

South Weston
Grade I listed.
C12 origin.
Building materials consist of stone rubble with stone dressings. Roofs are of slate with clay tiles on the porch roof.
Features include a C12 chancel, C13 nave with east bays and clerestory. There is also a mid C15 porch and west tower.
Windows range from C13 to C15 and feature various examples of two and three light designs with different styles of tracery.

Interior:
C12 chancel arch with triple shafts and moulded caps and bases. The aisle roofs contain some older principals with curved wall brackets. A window in the east contains original C12 stained glass. There are further examples of this in the upper lights of two windows to the north of the chancel.

St Leonard

Watlington

St Leonard

Wallingford
St. Leonard’s is the oldest of the three remaining churches in Wallingford. Believed to be of Saxon origin, signs of which are still visible, it has been rebuilt several times during its long history. St. Leonard’s is used for services every Sunday along with its sister church of St. Mary-le-More.

St Leonard

Woodcote

St Leonard

Banbury

St Leonard

Waterstock
Grade II* listed.
Origins in C12 and C14, however largely rebuilt during C19. Building material consists of flint rubble with limestone ashlar quoins, dressings and bands. Roof is C19 and of tile with decorative ridges.
Architectural features include a chancel, north transept, aisled nave, south porch and west tower. There are also corner buttresses.
Windows date from C14 and include various forms of decorated tracery.

Interior:
Capitals and part of a cable-moulded shaft on the west end of the south aisle. The south wall of the chancel also features a C13 carved head. There is a tympanum over the vestry which was removed from its original place on the north wall of the nave. There are two C15 arches to the south chapel and a C14 four-bay arcade.

St Leonard

Eynsham

St Leonard

Sunningwell
Grade II listed.
C13 origins. Building materials consist of uncoursed limestone rubble with ashlar dressings. The roof is of lead, with the exception of old tiles on the chancel roof.
Features include a C15 tower, south transept, and a C14 west porch. The chancel and nave are C13.
Windows range from C13 to C15 and are of two and three lights with decorated tracery.
Other features include a crenelated parapet with gargoyles. The west porch is also interesting and includes a Tudor-arched doorway with classical engravings.

Interior:
Medieval style floor tiles. The nave includes a Jacobean pulpit with C17 pews. The roof interior is C16 and features arch braces from vertical side struts.

St Leonard & St Catherine

Drayton St Leonard

St Luke

Garford

St Luke

Oxford
Founded in 1933 as a mission hall for the area of Cold Harbour. Canon Stather-Hunt, the then vicar of St Matthew’s Church on Marlborough Road, led the vision and had a real interest in the community in this area. St Matthew’s & St Luke’s have remained linked to the current day and support each other’s work.

St Margaret

Hinton Waldrist
The Church of England parish church of St Margaret is 13th century, but has been extensively remodelled since. It is a Grade II* listed building.

St Margaret

Little Faringdon
Little is known of the earliest history of this Grade II* listed church, although it is likely that a place of worship has existed here from Saxon times. The Church was extended the church in 1205 with the addition of an arcade with carved pillar capitals. An extremely rare medieval silver chalice, dated 1500, was used here and is now on loan to the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford.

Unusually this church has a porch built in the 1200s at the same time as the main reconstruction took place. Three Crusader crosses can be found on the left hand, outer door frame. The church has a number of other interesting features dating from the 13th century including a Norman tub font, and a window made from 13th century mediaeval stained glass fragments. The aumbry, in the north east wall of the Chancel, is one of only about six in England to have a ball flower decoration, which was fashionable in the time of Edward 1st.

St Margaret

Mapledurham
This beautiful church located in the heart of the Mapledurham country estate beside the River Thames is part of the pretty red-brick village with Jacobean almshouses and an ancient water mill. The interior includes good monuments and stained glass.

St Margaret

Binsey
The earliest datable stonework in the church today is the fine Norman arch of the south door, with its zig-zag pattern overlapping a round moulding, some dogs-tooth work and columns with carved capitals. The style of the doorway suggests a late twelfth-century date.

The lead-lined font-bowl in the nave may also be of this period.

Virtually the entire church was rebuilt, at least from waist height, in the 13th century, probably using the original limestone rubble. The Gothic chancel arch was inserted at this time, and the chancel itself enlarged to its present size, with the piscina and a tall lancet window (the lower part of which was subsequently blocked) inserted in the south wall. The trussed rafter roof in the chancel may also date from this time, as such roofs are rare in churches after 1400. The bell-cote is also 13th century. Lancets were inserted in the west and south walls and a door, now blocked but which may have led to monastic buildings, in the north wall. The porch was also added as part of this 13th century rebuilding.


In the 14th or 15th centuries, further windows were added in both nave and chancel. Those in the west and south walls of the nave consist of pairs of trefoiled windows, with deep internal splaying and wooden lintels, within a rectangular frame. They are earlier than the more elaborate 15th century Perpendicular Gothic cinquefoil three-light east and south windows in the chancel. The tie-beam nave roof was also raised about 2 ft above the original corbels as part of this work. The roof itself is of stone slates, possibly from Stonesfield, which began production about this time. Other work possibly carried out at this time was the buttressing of the chancel, probably to ensure that the roof structure (which was not renewed or strengthened with tie-beams) could support the stone slates.




St Margaret

Oxford
As north Oxford was built up and its population grew in Victorian times, new parishes were created out of parts of St. Giles’ parish. They included St Philip and St James’, consecrated in 1862 and St. Margaret’s, founded as a daughter church of St. Philip and St James in 1883. The church was designed by H. G. W. Drinkwater. The foundation stone was laid on 8 May 1883. The church was consecrated by Bishop Stubbs on 22 November 1893. A new tower designed by G. F. Bodley was started in 1899, but was never completed, this remains as the south-west porch. The Lady Chapel contains three fine windows by F. C. Eden based on an iconographic theme ‘The Plan of Salvation’, picturing the Nativity (Incarnation), the Crucifixion (Atonement) and Pentecost (the gift of the Spirit to the Church). St Margaret’s became a parish in its own right in August 1896. It was reunited with St Philip and St James parish once more in 1976, and St Philip and St James Church was declared redundant in 1982. In 1983 the parish of St Philip and St James with St Margaret and the parish of St Giles were reunited in a united benefice.

St Margaret

Harpsden
This beautiful village church located near Henley on Thames was originally Norman and built of flint and brick. Despite being enlarged in the C19, the interior has medieval details, Norman font and stone effigy and brasses.

St Margaret

Lewknor
Grade I listed.

Late C12; early C14 chancel, south aisle and porch (probably built for
Sir John de Lewknor); C15 vestry and tower; chancel restored 1845 by James
Johnson, and nave in 1863 by Arthur Blomfield. Flint rubble with limestone
ashlar dressings; gabled mid C19 tile roof. Chancel with vestry, nave with north
chapel and south aisle with porch; west tower. Early C14 five-light east window;
mid C19 light above; flanked by offset buttresses. Similar buttresses and
2-light windows in 3-bay side walls. C15 vestry with square-headed one-light
windows and parapet adjoins north chapel, which has blocked late C12
pointed-arched openings, blocked C17 round-headed doorway and blocked C15
two-light window: mid C19 three-light windows in side walls and mid C19 parapet.


North wall of 3-bay nave has 2-light plate tracery windows by Blomfield, late
C12 lancet to west bay and mid C19 corbel table. South wall of nave has similar
late C12 lancet and C12 corbel table in west bay. Early C14 south aisle has
2-light windows and 3-light east window. South porch has mid C19 carving of the
Lamb of God over pointed double-chamfered doorway: early C14 pointed moulded
south doorway to C19 plank door. Two-stage west tower has offset corner
buttresses, one- and 2-light windows, north-east stair turret and embattled
parapet; 3-light west window with restored mullions above C15 doorway with
face-masks to label stops and C19 double-leaf door with C12 crescent hinges.
Interior: chancel has early C14 piscina, 3 sedilia, tomb recess with recumbent
effigy of a lady, and doorway, all with very elaborate flowing-tracery and
crocketed canopies and finials; early C17 alabaster effigies of William Deane,
d.1621 and wife, and Sir Thomas Fleetwood, d.1629 and wife, were reset at west
end of chancel in 1845; fine wall monument of John Scrope, d.1752, has marble
bust set in aedicule with open pediment; brass to John Aldebourne, priest,
c.1380. 3-bay arch-braced roof of 1845. Early C12 chancel arch has zig-zag
mouldings and engaged shafts with crocketed capitals; impost moulding continued
as string course along north and part of south walls of nave, and an early C12
arch to north transpet. Nave has pulpit by Blomfield, mid C19 pews and roof and
medieval iron-bound parish chest: early C14 three-bay arcade of double-chamfered
arches on octagonal piers to south aisle, which has cinquefoil-headed piscina,
moulded string course, fine C12 font with linked roundel decoration and C18 wall
tablets.

St Martin

Bladon
St Martin’s Church in Bladon near Woodstock, Oxfordshire, England, is the Church of England parish church of Bladon-with-Woodstock. It is also the mother church of St Mary Magdalene at Woodstock, which was originally a chapel of ease. It is best known for the graves of the Spencer-Churchill family, including Sir Winston Churchill, in its churchyard.

St Martin

Sandford St Martin
Grade II* listed.
C13 origins, restored C19. Building materials consist of limestone and marlstone rubble with limestone-ashlar dressings. The roofs are of Stonesfield slate and steel metal.
Features include a chancel, aisled three bay nave, south porch and west tower.
Windows date from C13 and feature a range of styles, particularly prominent is the Perpendicular style. Typical details include two and three light window designs with reticulated tracery. The three storey tower includes a three-light window in Decorated style.
The north aisle has a parapet and is probably C13, although includes C14 windows. Gargoyles feature on the parapet string.

Interior:
The chancel arch is of banded ashlar and the arms of Elizabeth I are painted. The C13 south arcade has circular piers and moulded capitals. Other interesting features include a C14 piscina in the south aisle and the interior of the south porch, which has a ribbed vault and protects a C14 doorway.
There is also a C12 font.

St Martin

Shutford
Grade II* listed.
Late C12/C13 origins. Building materials consist of coursed ironstone rubble with regular coursed ironstone rubble and slate roofs.
Features include a chancel, nave, north chapel, north aisle and a west tower.
Windows date from C13 and include a variety of two and three-light Perpendicular windows with tracery. Lancet windows are also a feature of the chancel.
Other interesting features include a gabled stone porch with a pointed arched doorway. The tower is Perpendicular and is in two stages, with a C12 window on the ground floor.

St Mary

Lyford

St Mary

Ardley
Small village church with Early English chancel, C13-14 tower and late C18 nave.

St Mary

Shifford

St Mary

Swinbrook

St Mary

Sydenham

St Mary

Upper Heyford
Uffington, St Mary

St Mary

Uffington
An imposing, little-altered cruciform church of the 13th century, just below the famous White Horse carved out of the chalk hillside. It has a central octagonal tower, which lost its spire in a storm in 1740.

St Mary

Bampton
The evolution of Bampton church is one of the most complex in Oxfordshire. Bampton once lay at the heart of an Anglo Saxon royal estate and the church was a Saxon minster, whose size testified to its significance as an early religious foundation.

St Mary

Banbury
The present church (Grade I* listed) is a late Georgian building erected in the last decade of the 18th century and consecrated in September 1797. Designed by SP Cockerill, it was modelled on Wren’s church at Walbrook.

St Mary

Wootton

St Mary

Black Bourton
The highlight of the church is its 13th century wall paintings. Covered at the reformation, they were first uncovered when the church was restored in 1866. However, against the vicar’s wishes, they were again whitewashed and were not finally uncovered until 1932.

St Mary

Westwell
The most westerly well in Oxfordshire, Westwell boasts a beautiful church standing in a lush green churchyard. The nave is 12th Century with later additions.

St Mary

Bloxham
Large ironstone church mainly 14th and 15th century, but also a good Norman doorway. Very fine stone carvings both inside and out. Large east window by William Morris and Burne-Jones. Some remains of Medieval Paintings.

St Mary

Whitchurch
A church with Norman origins, located close to the River Thames, rebuilt in 1858 by Henry Woodyer in C14 style using some medieval work.

St Mary

Buscot

St Mary

Chalgrove
The exterior of Charlgrove St Mary is adequate but unexciting, though amazing wall paintings are hidden inside this modest exterior.

St Mary

Chesterton
The oldest part of the Anglican parish church of Saint Mary is a 12th-century arcade of three arches between the nave and the north aisle. The arcade is in the Transitional style between Norman and Early English Gothic. The church was rebuilt in the 13th century and reconsecrated in 1238. The chancel arch and arcade of the south aisle, both of which are Early English Gothic, date from this period. The Decorated Gothic bell tower was added early in the 14th century. The present Perpendicular Gothic windows in the south aisle were added in the 14th or 15th century. In the 15th century a clerestory was added to the nave and a five-light east window was inserted in the chancel.

In 1852 the east window was replaced with a Gothic Revival Decorated Gothic four-light one, and in 1854 the chancel arch was restored. In 1866 the architect F.C. Penrose restored much of the building, including the windows in the south aisle and some of those in the north aisle. He also added a turret staircase to the tower.

By 1552 St. Mary’s three bells and Sanctus bell. William Watts of Bedford cast the present tenor bell in about 1590. Henry Farmer of Evesham in Worcestershire and James Keene of Woodstock jointly cast the present treble and second bells in 1623. Richard III Chandler of Drayton Parslow in Buckinghamshire cast the present Sanctus bell in 1715. The clock was added in 1884

St Mary

Cogges
Unusual tower with clear French associations. The bowl of the font dates from the 12th Century.

St Mary

Longworth
St Mary’s is a 13th century church with numerous additions and alterations from the 14th to to the 17th centuries. The chancel screen is said to have been a gift to Longworth church by Archbishop Laud, perhaps when he was chancellor of Oxford University from 1629-1633. Other features of note include some very nicely carved medieval heads decorating the nave arches.

St Mary

Hardwick
St Mary, Cokethorpe Consists of chancel, nave, NW tower, and Victorian N aisle

It is now a School Chapel.

St Mary

East Hendred

St Mary

Newnham Murren
Grade II * listed.

C12 origin.

Building materials consist of flint with stone dressings and a plain tile roof.

Features include a nave and chancel plan with south aisle and a C19 porch to the north.

There is a single lancet to the left of the porch and two further lancets to the chancel, with additional lancets to the rear.

Interior:

C14 crown post roof.

St Mary

Farmoor
Farmoor is part of the parish of Cumnor, and until the 20th century parishioners worshipped 2 miles (3 km) away at the Church of England parish church of Saint Michael, Cumnor. There is now the church of Saint Mary, Farmoor that was built as a chapel of ease.

St Mary

North Leigh
Fine fan vaulting in the Perpendicular Gothic style chapel. There is a 15th Century doom painting in the nave.

St Mary

Garsington