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St Mary

Salford
Parish church. C12 and C14 origins largely rebuilt by G E Street in 1854-5. Roughly coursed limestone rubble with ashlar dressings; concrete tile roofs with stepped coped verges.

St Mary

Little Coxwell
A grade II* Norman Church with C13 bellcote

St Mary

Steeple Barton

St Mary

Glympton

St Mary

Adwell

St Mary

Swerford
Church. Late C13. and C15, restored and enlarged 1846 by H.J. Underwood. 3-bay nave and north aisle, chancel, west steeple, south porch and north-east vestry. Marlstone ashlar and some rubble; lead and Welsh-slate roofs. Slated chancel has a traceried east window of 1859 in a Perpendicular opening and has, to south, 2 blocked C15 windows, and a 2-light square-headed window with ogee tracery and a low transom, below which are 4 small ogee-treaded lights; rubble walls and low buttresses may be C13. Parapetted ashlar nave has a Decorated south doorway, with continuous moulding and ballflower ornament plus an old plank door, sheltered by a late C14 porch with parapet, large gargoyles and a sundial; south wall has 3 large square-headed 3-light windows of c.1400 with quatrefoils in the tracery, and above them single-light clerestory windows with ogee tracery.

St Mary & St Edburga

Stratton Audley

St Mary Magdalen

Oxford

St Mary Magdalene

Balscote

St Mary Magdalene

Wardington
A large church built on a slight rise in the centre of an attractive ironstone village on the northernmost boundary of the county. The chancel contains some Norman remains but otherwise the church is largely 13th and 14th century with two arcades and some good Decorated windows. Unusual points to note are a large holy water stoup in the porch and an unusual round window over the chancel arch

St Mary Magdalene

Duns Tew

St Mary Magdalene

Shippon

St Mary Magdalene

Crowmarsh

St Mary Magdalene

Stoke Talmage

St Mary Magdalene Church, Woodstock

Woodstock

St Mary the Virgin

Ambrosden
A church has stood here from Saxon times for the Parish of Ambrosden was referred to as being already in existence as early as 1069 AD, but this Norman tower and a church which included part of the nave were built at the end of the 11th or the beginning of the 12th century. The actual year of its consecration is unknown but it is assumed to have been in the month of September close to the birthday of the Virgin Mary whose name it bears.



St Mary the Virgin

Upton

St Mary the Virgin

Wheatley

St Mary the Virgin

Witney

St Mary the Virgin

Childrey

St Mary the Virgin

Waterperry
An attractive small church of Saxon origin in a peaceful corner next to Waterperry House and its well-known gardens. It has some fine medieval stained glass, memorials, Georgian box pews and brasses.

St Mary the Virgin

Broughton
The church was built in the early 14th century, at the time Sir John de Broughton was building the adjacent castle. There is a fine tower and plain broach spire. Inside , the chancel and the nave are separated by a rare stone screen, and there is a remarkable collection of effigies and monuments.

St Mary the Virgin

Charlton-on-Otmoor

St Mary the Virgin

Chipping Norton
One of the great Cotswold churches, whose nave was rebuilt about 1485 by a local wool merchant, John Ashfield. The clerestory, which runs the length of the nave, bathes the church with light.

St Mary the Virgin

Cottisford
This small stone built church was built in the 13th Century on the site of a Saxon Church by the Abbot of Bec to whom the manor had been given by the family of the Norman Baron who had received it after the invasion of England in 1066. Apart from the removal of the tower it remains unchanged to the present day. In the church will be found a memorial tablet to the well known author Flora Thompson (author of ‘Lark Rise to Candleford’ who was born and lived in the adjacent hamlet of Juniper Hill whilst a girl.

St Mary The Virgin

Long Wittenham

St Mary The Virgin

Ewelme
The church, cloistered almshouses and school were built as a group about 1432 by the Earl (later Duke) and Countess of Suffolk. She was Alice Chaucer, granddaughter of the poet Geoffrey Chaucer: her magnificent canopied tomb, with alabaster effigy, lies beside the altar. Note the very tall font cover of 1475.

St Mary The Virgin

North Aston

St Mary The Virgin

North Stoke
The church was built in the 1230s and is almost entirely medieval, and still has C14 wall paintings, ancient oak pews and a brick floor. The Ridgeway path runs through the church yard, to either side crossing the River Thames and climbing the Chilterns.

St Mary the Virgin

Freeland
This unaltered Victorian Gothic church of 1870 was designed by J. L. Pearson, an important Gothic Revival architect. The glass and wall-paintings – which have recently been restored to their former glory – by his favourite craftsmen, Clayton and Bell. The adjoining parsonage and the school form part of the scheme.

St Mary The Virgin

Oxford
This great church, on the north side of the High Street, is both a parish church and the University church. The remarkable spire, certainly the finest of all Oxford’s famous spires, was constructed in the 13th century and is a tour de force of medieval sculpture. The rest of the church was rebuilt in the late 15th century in Perpendicular at its most flamboyant, with enormous windows, high roof and clerestory and elaborate battlements.

St Mary The Virgin

Shipton-u-Wychwood
Parish Church. Early C13, extended C14, altered C15, restored 1859 by Diocesan Architect G E Street who virtually rebuilt the chancel. Rubble with freestone dressings, leaded roofs to nave and aisles, stone slate to chancel. 3-bay clere- storied nave with aisles extended as north and south chapels, south porch and west tower; vestry to north-east. Irregular plinths. Parapeted aisles and nave walls, high ptiched chancel roof. Principal feature is the 3-stage west tower with angle buttresses weathered to each stage and thus forming virtually clasping buttresses to upper stage.

St Mary the Virgin

Kidlington
There has been a church here for about 900 years. The present building dates from 1220 when a new church was built in the Early English style on the foundations of an earlier church. The church is cruciform, and if you look towards the high altar you will see that the chancel is inclined to the south. It is just sixteen inches off centre but looks more. This is quite common in cruciform churches and represents the leaning head of Christ on the cross.

St Mary The Virgin

Kirtlington

St Mary the Virgin

Buckland

St Mary the Virgin

Chastleton

St Mary the Virgin

Hardwick-cum-Tusmore

St Mary the Virgin

Adderbury
Arguably the finest parish church in Oxfordshire, St Mary’s, Adderbury, dates to the 13th century. The main interest here is the superb series of carvings both inside and outside the church. Look out for the sculptures. There are grotesques and figures in the cornices of the side aisles and tower. These include a long tailed, growling dragon and a group of medieval musicians.

St Mary Virgin

Ashbury

St Mary Virgin

Thame

St Mary Virgin

Weston-on-The-Green

St Mary Virgin

Charlbury

St Mary Virgin

Cropredy
Cropredy’s great treasure is the very rare pre-Reformation Brass Lectern in the form of an eagle. St Mary’s was largely rebuilt in the first half of the 14th century in typical Decorated style with tall and elegant arcades in both aisles.

St Mary Virgin

Longcot

St Mary Virgin

Iffley

St Mary Virgin

Ipsden
An interesting small C12 church close to the Chiltern hills, formerly a chapel of North Stoke, and under the patronage of the Abbey of Bec in Normandy, which may account for the elaborate details in the chancel.

St Mary-le-More

Wallingford
St. Mary-le-More occupies a central position in Wallingford. It is believed that there has been a Christian building on the site since at least Norman times. That first Christian building was rebuilt at the end of the 13th Century. The building has undergone at least two major changes since then and is now used for many community activities as well as for regular worship.

St Mary’s Church, Lower Heyford and Caulcott

Lower Heyford
Anglican church dating from around 1350

St Mary's Convent

Wantage

St Matthew

Harwell
St Matthew’s Harwell exemplifies the architecture from Traditional Norman, through early English, to decorated. It appears to have been constructed as follows: 1190-1200 North and South Transepts, 1200-1220 Tower and Nave Arcades, 1270-1310 Chancel, 1275-1325 South and North Aisle Walls and reconstructed Porch, 1975 Ground Floor and Upper Room extension to North Wall.