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St Mary

Newnham Murren
Grade II * listed.

C12 origin.

Building materials consist of flint with stone dressings and a plain tile roof.

Features include a nave and chancel plan with south aisle and a C19 porch to the north.

There is a single lancet to the left of the porch and two further lancets to the chancel, with additional lancets to the rear.

Interior:

C14 crown post roof.

St Mary

Farmoor
Farmoor is part of the parish of Cumnor, and until the 20th century parishioners worshipped 2 miles (3 km) away at the Church of England parish church of Saint Michael, Cumnor. There is now the church of Saint Mary, Farmoor that was built as a chapel of ease.

St Mary

North Leigh
Fine fan vaulting in the Perpendicular Gothic style chapel. There is a 15th Century doom painting in the nave.

St Mary

Garsington

St Mary

Great Milton
Grade I listed.

C11/12 origins with C13 and mainly early C14 additions. Building materials consist of coursed limestone rubble and ashlar dressings. Roofs are of metal sheet.

Central features include a three-bay aisled nave with a chancel, west tower and
south porch. The chancel retains a tiny round-headed window on each side and a C13
lancet to south, but has two-light side windows and a four-light east window of
Decorated style.

The south aisle is entirely elaborate Decorated work with a high
moulded plinth, gabled buttresses with ogee-canpied niches, and three-light side
windows, a four-light east window and a two -light west window, each of a different
tracery pattern.

The two-storey south porch has a ribbed quadripartite vault with a
richly-carved boss, and the parapet continuing around the aisle has fantastic
gargoyles. The north aisle is plainer with three-light windows of reticulated tracery,
but incorporates a C13 doorway with deeply-moulded arch and five shafts, both
detached and attached, with stiff-leaf capitals.

St Mary

Hampton Poyle
Grade II* listed.

Late C13 origins. Building materials consist of coursed limestone rubble. The roof is stone-coped, gabled and of Welsh slate.

Central features include a north aisle of c.1360 and late C13 south aisle. Most of the church was restored in 1841
and then again during the 1860s. There is also a chancel and an aisled nave.

Windows contain a range of examples of one and two light windows, with a C19 Geometrical-style 3-light design in the east window, and a C15 two-light window. There is also a C19 lancet window and a label mould over the late C13 chamfered pointed-arched doorway to the south. The north aisle has a C14 hood mould over a 3-light Perpendicular window to the east, as well as a C15 two-light window and mid C19 buttress to north.

Interior: Contains mid C19 marble reredos. There is a mid C19 piscina and benches; backs to benches have C17 panels with scribed lozenges. The chancel arch is C14 and double-chamfered.

St Mary

Headington

St Mary

Pyrton
THE Church is built of flint with stone dressings on the nave and chancel and the roofs are covered with copper. It probably dates to C14. This copper was used in replacement of the former lead roof which twice in the space of a year was stripped by thieves. The original roof was thatched and the ridge marks of this roof can still be seen on the east side of the tower.

The Tower is square with buttresses to give added stability. The belfry windows are really ‘sound holes’ filled with louvres which allow the sound of the bells to radiate.

Lacking stone for a SPIRE, a thin leaded spirelet was built from within the parapet of the tower. This style of building became so popular in the County, that such spirelets are known as ‘Hertfordshire Spikes’, although they are to be found elsewhere. The tower and the nave have embattled parapets. …

St Mary

Henley-on-Thames
The church with its attractive C16 tower, in stone and knapped flint, dominates the skyline of the town and is located beside the River Thames. The church has C13 origins and was enlarged and remodelled in the C15, C18 and C19.

St Mary

Cholsey
St Mary’s Cholsey is a village church with an active congregation. Founded as an abbey church by King Ethelred the Unready in approximately 986. Much of the church as seen today is Norman and it unusually retains its original cruciform shape. It was reordered internally in the 1980s. Agatha Christie is buried in the church yard.

St Mary

Holwell
Holwell Church was consecrated in 1895 and is in good order.

St Mary

Salford
Parish church. C12 and C14 origins largely rebuilt by G E Street in 1854-5. Roughly coursed limestone rubble with ashlar dressings; concrete tile roofs with stepped coped verges.

St Mary

Little Coxwell
A grade II* Norman Church with C13 bellcote

St Mary

Steeple Barton
Grade II* listed.
C14 origins. Building materials consist of coursed limestone rubble with ashlar quoins and dressings. The roofs are stone-coped and gabled with some artificial slate.
Features include a C14 two-bay chancel and nave, south aisle, a C15 west tower and a mid C19 gabled south porch.
Windows are in Decorated style and date from C14. They include a range of two-light and three-light designs. There is a Perpendicular style window to the west side of the church.

Interior:
The chancel features a Minton tile floor with a C19 chancel arch and also a C19 arch-braced roof. The south aisle roof is similarly designed. There is also a C14 piscina and a C12 fluted tub font.

St Mary

Glympton

St Mary

Adwell
The original parish church is believed to have been built late in the 12th century, although the earliest documentation of it is dated 1254. It had only a nave and chancel. The latter may have been enlarged in the 13th century, judging by its east window which was early Decorated Gothic. In the 14th century new windows were inserted in the nave and a new west door was added. In 1553 the building was recorded as having a bell-cot with two bells. All of the walls were repaired around 1800, but by the early 1860s the building was considered too weak to be restored.



The old church building was demolished and in 1865 it was replaced with a new Church of England parish church of Saint Mary designed by the Gothic Revival architect Arthur Blomfield. Blomfield’s design replicated the early Decorated style, but the new building retained the south doorway of the old church, which is in the transitional style between Norman and Early English Gothic. The new church also retains the memorials from inside the old one, including a stone effigy of a knight from about 1300. The new building has no aisles, but has north and south chapels arranged as transepts either side of the chancel. There is no tower, but a bell-cot with one bell. The bell dates from about 1350 and so may be from the old church building.

St Mary

Swerford
Church. Late C13. and C15, restored and enlarged 1846 by H.J. Underwood. 3-bay nave and north aisle, chancel, west steeple, south porch and north-east vestry. Marlstone ashlar and some rubble; lead and Welsh-slate roofs. Slated chancel has a traceried east window of 1859 in a Perpendicular opening and has, to south, 2 blocked C15 windows, and a 2-light square-headed window with ogee tracery and a low transom, below which are 4 small ogee-treaded lights; rubble walls and low buttresses may be C13. Parapetted ashlar nave has a Decorated south doorway, with continuous moulding and ballflower ornament plus an old plank door, sheltered by a late C14 porch with parapet, large gargoyles and a sundial; south wall has 3 large square-headed 3-light windows of c.1400 with quatrefoils in the tracery, and above them single-light clerestory windows with ogee tracery.

St Mary & St Edburga

Stratton Audley
The Church is a Grade 1 listed building without Victorian ‘improvement’. Evidence of Saxon origins with 13th – 15th century development. Features include 13th and 14th century arcades and 14th century traceried windows, a beautiful Jacobean pulpit, medieval font and a crevence table of 1636.

St Mary Magdalen

Oxford
A Saxon wooden church stood here a thousand years ago, but this was burnt down in 1074. Robert D’Oyly, the Norman Constable of Oxford, built a single aisle chapel to replace the wooden church. Saint Hugh, the Bishop of Lincoln, rebuilt the church in 1194. Following the English Reformation, the church’s patronage passed from St Frideswide’s to Christ Church. In 1841–42, George Gilbert Scott, then young and unknown, rebuilt the chancel and the north aisle. This complemented his Martyrs’ Memorial just north of the church. It was the first Victorian Gothic interior in Oxford.

Compared to other Oxford churches, it is relatively high, with a strong emphasis on Anglo-Catholicism.

St Mary Magdalene

Balscote
The earliest features of the Church of England parish church of St. Mary Magdalene include a Norman font and an Early English style window. Most of the present church building is 14th century, in the Decorated Gothic style.

St Mary Magdalene

Wardington
A large church built on a slight rise in the centre of an attractive ironstone village on the northernmost boundary of the county. The chancel contains some Norman remains but otherwise the church is largely 13th and 14th century with two arcades and some good Decorated windows. Unusual points to note are a large holy water stoup in the porch and an unusual round window over the chancel arch

St Mary Magdalene

Duns Tew

St Mary Magdalene

Shippon
The earliest record of a building on this site is 1284. However it was in ruins by 1733. The present church consecrated in 1855 was designed by Sir George Gilbert Scott in the 14th Century Decorated style and consists of a chancel, nave, a porch on the north side and a bell tower with crocketed spire. At the east end of the churchyard there is an altar tomb in memory of Revd W A Strange, first Sanskrit scholar at Oxford University, headmaster of Abingdon School and the first Curate at St Mary’s. Over the southern doorway is the crest of Abingdon Abbey, with which Shippon was long associated.

St Mary Magdalene

Crowmarsh

St Mary Magdalene

Stoke Talmage
Grade II listed.
C13 origins although rebuilt C18. Building materials consist of limestone rubble with ashlar dressings. The roof is gabled and of tile. It is built in Gothic Revival style
Features include a C19 vestry, south porch and north aisle. There is also a chancel and single-aisled nave with a west tower.
Windows are Perpendicular style and contain lots of examples of ‘Y’ tracery. The west tower contains C13 reset lancet windows.
The south porch is gabled with a double chamfered doorway.

Interior:
Decorated-style piscine with a mid C19 chancel arch. The foliate capitals are C13.
Most of the fixtures and fittings (including a pulpit, lectern and pews) are C19.

St Mary Magdalene Church, Woodstock

Woodstock
St Mary Magdalene Church (Grade II listed) was built in the reign of Henry I for the convenience of the court during royal visits to the royal hunting lodge of Woodstock Manor – the main parish church was (and remained for centuries) at St Martin’s Church in Bladon, for which St Mary Magdalene was a chapel at ease.
The chancel was built in the 14th century but the church has been significantly rebuilt and altered over the centuries: by the late 18th century the church tower was in a dangerous state and it was rebuilt in 1784; and the church did not escape Victorian ‘improvements’ being largely reconstructed in 1878.

St Mary the Virgin

Ambrosden
A church has stood here from Saxon times for the Parish of Ambrosden was referred to as being already in existence as early as 1069 AD, but this Norman tower and a church which included part of the nave were built at the end of the 11th or the beginning of the 12th century. The actual year of its consecration is unknown but it is assumed to have been in the month of September close to the birthday of the Virgin Mary whose name it bears.



St Mary the Virgin

Upton

St Mary the Virgin

Wheatley

St Mary the Virgin

Witney

St Mary the Virgin

Childrey
Grade I listed
Anglican
The present cruciform church dates from the 12th Century. However, there is evidence of an earlier Saxon minster on the site. It contains a unique 12th century lead font, medieval glass depicting the life of Mary, medieval and Victorian tiles, some fine 15th Century brasses, and the effigy of a 14th Century knight believed to be Geoffrey Frethorne a member of the Frethorne family who had very strong links with the church at that time. The one-handed clock, on the tower dates from 1763.

St Mary the Virgin

Waterperry
An attractive small church of Saxon origin in a peaceful corner next to Waterperry House and its well-known gardens. It has some fine medieval stained glass, memorials, Georgian box pews and brasses.

St Mary the Virgin

Broughton
The church was built in the early 14th century, at the time Sir John de Broughton was building the adjacent castle. There is a fine tower and plain broach spire. Inside , the chancel and the nave are separated by a rare stone screen, and there is a remarkable collection of effigies and monuments.

St Mary the Virgin

Charlton-on-Otmoor

St Mary the Virgin

Chipping Norton
One of the great Cotswold churches, whose nave was rebuilt about 1485 by a local wool merchant, John Ashfield. The clerestory, which runs the length of the nave, bathes the church with light.

St Mary the Virgin

Cottisford
This small stone built church was built in the 13th Century on the site of a Saxon Church by the Abbot of Bec to whom the manor had been given by the family of the Norman Baron who had received it after the invasion of England in 1066. Apart from the removal of the tower it remains unchanged to the present day. In the church will be found a memorial tablet to the well known author Flora Thompson (author of ‘Lark Rise to Candleford’ who was born and lived in the adjacent hamlet of Juniper Hill whilst a girl.

St Mary The Virgin

Long Wittenham
The original church was Norman with later medieval additions. It contains interesting Jacobean furniture including stall and pulpit which came from Exeter College, Oxford.

St Mary The Virgin

Ewelme
The church, cloistered almshouses and school were built as a group about 1432 by the Earl (later Duke) and Countess of Suffolk. She was Alice Chaucer, granddaughter of the poet Geoffrey Chaucer: her magnificent canopied tomb, with alabaster effigy, lies beside the altar. Note the very tall font cover of 1475.

St Mary The Virgin

North Aston
A winding drive with spectacular views across the Cherwell valley leads to this small church, so close to the large house next to it as to seem almost joined. Most of the church is Decorated of the 14th century but it has been much altered, particularly in the 19th-century restoration by Gilbert Scott. Next to the chancel is a fine alabaster tomb with effigies thought to be of John Anne and his wife, who lived in the manor in the late 15th century.

St Mary The Virgin

North Stoke
The church was built in the 1230s and is almost entirely medieval, and still has C14 wall paintings, ancient oak pews and a brick floor. The Ridgeway path runs through the church yard, to either side crossing the River Thames and climbing the Chilterns.

St Mary the Virgin

Freeland
This unaltered Victorian Gothic church of 1870 was designed by J. L. Pearson, an important Gothic Revival architect. The glass and wall-paintings – which have recently been restored to their former glory – by his favourite craftsmen, Clayton and Bell. The adjoining parsonage and the school form part of the scheme.

St Mary The Virgin

Oxford
This great church, on the north side of the High Street, is both a parish church and the University church. The remarkable spire, certainly the finest of all Oxford’s famous spires, was constructed in the 13th century and is a tour de force of medieval sculpture. The rest of the church was rebuilt in the late 15th century in Perpendicular at its most flamboyant, with enormous windows, high roof and clerestory and elaborate battlements.

St Mary The Virgin

Shipton-u-Wychwood
Parish Church. Early C13, extended C14, altered C15, restored 1859 by Diocesan Architect G E Street who virtually rebuilt the chancel. Rubble with freestone dressings, leaded roofs to nave and aisles, stone slate to chancel. 3-bay clere- storied nave with aisles extended as north and south chapels, south porch and west tower; vestry to north-east. Irregular plinths. Parapeted aisles and nave walls, high ptiched chancel roof. Principal feature is the 3-stage west tower with angle buttresses weathered to each stage and thus forming virtually clasping buttresses to upper stage.

St Mary the Virgin

Kidlington
There has been a church here for about 900 years. The present building dates from 1220 when a new church was built in the Early English style on the foundations of an earlier church. The church is cruciform, and if you look towards the high altar you will see that the chancel is inclined to the south. It is just sixteen inches off centre but looks more. This is quite common in cruciform churches and represents the leaning head of Christ on the cross.

St Mary The Virgin

Kirtlington
The oldest visible parts of the present Church of England parish church of St Mary the Virgin include the early 12th-century Norman arches supporting the central bell tower, and a tympanum of the same date that is now over the vestry door. Beneath the floor of the chancel are the foundations of a former apse that also was built early in the 12th century. About 1250 the nave was rebuilt and north and south aisles were added, each linked with the nave by arcades of three bays. The transeptal chapel of Our Lady on the south side of the tower may be of the same date, and the apse was replaced with a rectangular chancel late in the 13th century.

The west window of the nave dates from the 14th century, as do two windows flanking a blocked 13th-century doorway in the north aisle. The east window of the chancel, west doorway of the nave and south doorway of the south aisle are also 14th century. In the 15th century a clerestory was added to the nave and a porch was added to the south door.The Lady Chapel was also rebuilt in the 15th century, and other late mediaeval additions include the Perpendicular Gothic windows of the south aisle and another Perpendicular Gothic window in the north aisle.

St Mary the Virgin

Buckland

St Mary the Virgin

Chastleton

St Mary the Virgin

Hardwick-cum-Tusmore

St Mary the Virgin

Adderbury
Arguably the finest parish church in Oxfordshire, St Mary’s, Adderbury, dates to the 13th century. The main interest here is the superb series of carvings both inside and outside the church. Look out for the sculptures. There are grotesques and figures in the cornices of the side aisles and tower. These include a long tailed, growling dragon and a group of medieval musicians.

St Mary Virgin

Ashbury

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